Shake

Shake It Up is The Cars’ fourth studio album and contains the band’s first Billboard top ten hit with the title track. Released in 1981, Shake It Up sees the band continuing their unprecedented string of unquestionable classics (1978’s The Cars, 1979’s Candy-O, and 1980’s Panorama). Though I’m partial to their self-titled debut, Shake it Up, in addition to the band’s other early releases, are strikingly inexpensive to obtain. One could obtain their first five albums for roughly $2 a pop. Definitely worth the charge of admission.

The Great Lost Kinks Album Versus Prudentman and the Groove Go Round (Part One of One)

TGLKAWhat once was lost… should sometimes remain lost. Not the case with this arousing little nugget of Kinks history. The Great Lost Kinks Album, for those of you who don’t know, was NOT in fact an album recorded by the band that was mysteriously whisked away by the inevitable hands of fate, then miraculously found and released some seven years later to a wide and welcoming audience. Instead, The Great Lost Kinks Album was a compilation of B-sides, film and television themes, songs written and performed by Dave Davies for his never-released solo album, and various other unreleased tracks.

TGLKA BackApart from containing some pretty damn rare (at the time) Kinks tracks, TGLKA (you can figure it out) was not authorized by the band, and according to the lovely Wikipedia article, Reprise, the label, never even informed the band of its release. According to the same article (mentioned in the previous paragraph), the band (The Kinks… keep up) became aware of the album only after it appeared in the US Billboard charts. A lawsuit ensued and Reprise was forced to discontinue the album in 1975, some two years after its release, and the rest is Kinks history.

On a COMPLETELY unrelated note, why are we still fastening our shoes with string? Velcro tried (and failed) in the 80s, but it’s 2013, people! We haven’t developed an updated technique with which to secure our feet clothes? We need to get to work!