Breakaway

A few things I didn’t notice about Art Garfunkel’s 1975 Columbia records release, Breakaway. 1) Richard Perry produced it (Mr. Perry is famous for his work with Harry Nilsson), and 2) the track My Little Town has Paul Simon on it, making it a legitimate Simon & Garfunkel song. Their last? Of that I’m not sure, but it’s a good day to find out. Thank you, 42 year old hype sticker!

Stick Around

(Very) likely acquired from Atomic Records (Milwaukee, WI) around the summer of 2001, this perfectly preserved Rocket from the Crypt logo sticks prominently on the office “coffee table.” A few other random bits and bobs linger around and throughout (needed to keep that organic Dole sticker), but this off-center design is one of my favs. RIP Atomic Records, and thanks for the free schwag!

Newly Remastered for Vinyl

What was, a short week ago, just entering my conscious via casual coffee conversation, is now a welcomed member of our record library. The 20th anniversary of the From Dusk Till Dawn soundtrack is featured on double blood-red splattered vinyl, comes with a foil-stamped number of 5500, and was officially approved for release by Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. Not sure what that says, but it says something.

The Hype of Monolith of Phobos

Claypool-LennonI can’t wait for the sun to go down, and then re-emerge tomorrow morning. For when that celestial journey yet again occurs, I’ll have the allotted time to dive into The Claypool Lennon Delirium. This double LP, featuring Primus’ Les Claypool and John’s Sean Lennon, seems like just the whimsical duo for an overcast (forecasted) Sunday morning. Drink responsibly tonight, kids, and check out Monolith of Phobos.

Three Decades of Hype

Revere1986 was a very fruitful year for the Beastie Boys. Nearly every track from their debut LP saw a 12″ or 7″ release (It’s the New Style b/w Paul Revere featured here), and the band, with a lot of help from producer Rick Rubin, sold a very sizable amount of records. This hype sticker, and the music it promotes, is now 30 years old. Crazytown. RIP MCA.

(Less Than) Mystery Sticker

KIllNot much of a mystery after all, especially considering the last track, but the lack of band reference on this promotional sticker is slightly interesting, if at the very least moderately comical. Although this sticker has (clearly) seen better days, the music within this (not-so) cryptic album remains as timeless as hypocrisy itself. Stay angry, my friends.

Sale is Unlawful

HoneyStickersSo, by this sticker’s disclaimer, is the Atlantic Recording Corporation storing this copy of The Honeydrippers’ 1984 album Volume One on my shelf for free? I haven’t seen any checks coming in, and furthermore, was my purchase of this album done in an illegal fashion? Am I an accomplice for trading cash for this licensed promotional record? All these questions, and many more on tomorrow’s episode of, The Prudent Groove.

The Future of 2000

MikeThe record on which this sticker is attached was small in stature, but large in overall significance. With only four tracks, Eye of the Cyklops from Mix Master Mike was the first record I’d owned, or even seen, that featured a copyright date that didn’t start with 19. Released March 21st of 2000, I’d purchased this record for its mind-blowing shockability, but have since been happy with the music contained within. I am, as I assume many of you are, ashamed to admit how long ago 2000 now seems.

The #1 Pop Group of the ’80s

SupplyI’ve never considered Air Supply to be the #1 pop group of the ’80s, and I doubt I ever will. I mean, Making Love out of Nothing at All sounds a little politically incorrect if you take it literally, but it is a damn good song. A smash? Meh. Also, why is the “all” in “all their classics” underlined? I’m surprised the copywriting team only used one punctuation mark to help sell the fruits of these 1980s Gods. At the end of the day, this 32 year old sticker offers a glimpse of Arista Records’ “gotcha” selling points, and deserves to be remembered (to be quickly forgotten again by tomorrow’s post).

Stick it to Me

Clean_StickerSecured atop the cellophane sheath to Faith No More’s Sol Invictus, their latest, is this color-printed marketing sticker promoting this release’s colored vinyl (or lack there of) goodness that lives within. In about 5 or so years this sticker will be dropped from social consciousness (if it hasn’t already), as do most, if not all throw away marketing stickers, so let’s take a moment today and pay a little attention to the subtle, short-lived details that surround a modern album’s release… or don’t. I’ll have no way of knowing what the hell you do. Happy hump day!

Comedy in Outer Space

JoseSo, when the decision to purchase an album is based on the 50+ year old advertisement stuck to the cover of an unheard album, you know there is a problem. Jose Jimenez, and the 1960? promo sticker that surrounds Jose Jimenez at Hungry and I starring Bill Dana, is the culprit here, and I am the helpless victim.