This is…

This is Henry Mancini is a dynamite double LP “best of” release from RCA Victor. Released in 1970, This is contains the finest cuts from Mr. Mancini’s esteemed resume: Peter Gunn, Moon River, My One and Only, Mr. Lucky, March of the Cue Balls, Midnight Cowboy, and of course, The Pink Panther Theme. If you’re the casual Mancini listener and are looking for a catch-all release, This is Henry Mancini is exactly what you’re looking for.

(A)Live Album

Live Album (aka the Grand Funk Railroad live album) was released by Capitol Records in the summer of 1970. Though the gatefold cover shows the band performing at the Atlanta International Pop Festival (fourth of July weekend), none of Live Album’s tracks were recorded there. A little food for misguided thought. Also present at the festival were It’s a Beautiful Day, Procol Harum, B.B. King, The Allman Brothers Band, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Spirit, and Mott the Hoople. Sounds like a dangerous time. It’s no wonder none of the band’s songs from this performance were included on the record.

Gold-ish

Neil Diamond struck it rich with his 1970 live album, Gold. This is a 1973 reissue, but the material is the same as that on the original 1970 album (for those caring to know such things). The material was recorded on July 15, 1970 at The Troubadour in Los Angeles (a great, and relatively small venue). It’s a great listen, but don’t take my word for it. Extinct trade magazine Cashbox had this to say in October of 1969: “On stage Diamond radiates the same excitement that has made pop stars from Sinatra to Presley, and it’s a sensation that can’t be described, only felt.”

How it Was to be Young Again

Was this how it was to be young again, circa: 1940 or 1941? Time Life Records certainly thought so back in 1970 when this 3x LP comp was released. 30, unoriginal (read: covers… or impostors) tracks span the popular swing sound during this two-year period, highlighting works from Duke Ellington, Harry James, Artie Shaw, Les Brown, Glenn Miller, and the like. If you’re in the mood (see what I did there?) for original swing era recordings, The Swing Era: The Music of 1940-1941; How It Was to be Young Then is NOT for you, but if you’re satisfied with some unobtrusive background instrumental ditties, then this box set may be your bag.

From Rags to Bitches

ragsYou know, when one gets older, one finds the inherent need to dibble-dabble in the piano rag greatness of Scott Joplin, as delightfully depicted by pianist, Joshua Rifkin on Nonesuch Records’ 1970 release. I guess, nothing else needs saying, after that prominent display. Please do carry on about your Thursday evening. Cheers.

The Familiar Bridge

BridgeAll this time, I thought Mr. Garfunkel wrote Bridge Over Troubled Water, but apparently, it was Mr. Simon. Perhaps it was Mr. Garfunk’s singing that threw me off, but none-the-less, I learned a bit of music history today in prep for this post. S&G’s last, and most prolific single continues to linger in the lore of pop-classic-rock-radio euphoria, and it’s only been something like, 46 years…