A Tremendous Emotional Experience

afWhen someone, let’s say Timmy. When Timmy thinks of a tremendous emotional experience, Timmy often doesn’t think of achieving this tremendous emotional experience by listening to high quality records. Timmy is a fool. What Timmy isn’t realizing is that Timmy isn’t in tune with Audio Fidelity Records. If you own a bow tie, or know what one is, you can enjoy a smoke, a stiff buttoned-up shirt, and the high quality hi-fi listening pleasure of Audio Fidelity Records. Don’t be a Timmy. Treat yourself to a tremendous emotional experience. Go ahead. You’ve earned it.

The Dot Records Customer Service Plan

dotplanPresented below, in its entirety, is the Dot Records Customer Service Plan, as found on one of their (early 1960s?) inserts. Enjoy.

IMPORTANT MESSAGE TO OUR CUSTOMERS

Dear Customer:

Have you ever asked your record dealer for a Dot album and found that it is not in stock? If so, we’d like to tell you about the Dot Customer Service Plan and how it works.

If your dealer does not have the Dot album of your choice, ask him to use the Dot Customer Service Plan postage-paid post cards to order that album directly from Dot Records in Hollywood. Your order will be sent to him by return mail, and you will be notified of its arrival at your dealer’s by post card. Thus, your dealer gets credit for the sale even though he did not have the album in stock. Support your local dealer by availing yourself of this plan.

A New World of Sound on DECCA

deccaIt’s been a while since we’ve seen a new Decca insert. This one, from a 1963 album by Irving Fields Trio features a rather minimal Jazz section, but boasts a hefty sum by both Bing Crosby (titled Bing’s Hollywood) and Al Jolson. The Mood Music section is where I’m going to spend my time cherry picking, but there is plenty for even the novice listener to explore.

The Eight Questions Most Often Asked about Stereo Records

flipThe flip side to Thursday’s Full Dimensional Stereo insert from Capitol Records is this beautiful and informative breakdown of Capitol’s Full Dimensional Stereo sound, or as they state, The Eight Questions Most Often Asked about Stereo Records. Have a read, enjoy the mid-century art, and don’t forget to take notes… there will be a quiz at the end of the week.

Full Dimensional Stereo

dimensionalPimping the sensuous, splashy stereo sound to a mass of minions mothering mono was a popular venture in the dawn of this new recording and distribution era. Many vibrant inserts painstakingly detailing this new process were produced, such as this from Capitol Records from the late 50s. It’s an interesting feat to fancy a world where this (by today’s standards) common technique was the shiny new toy on the shelf. I’m gratified that so many labels of the time spent so much on promoting this recording method, which now only seem to exist stuffed inside an indiscriminate album jacket at the thrift store. Beauty, is indeed, in the eye (and ear) of the beholder.

From Life to the Moon

totheprintedmoonWas flipping though a November, 1969 issue of Life magazine last night, you know, the one with “The Rough-cut King of Country Music” on the cover, aka Johnny Cash, and I came across this amazing full page ad for Time Life Records’ 6x LP box set, To the Moon. I’d acquired this piece of Americana at my brick and mortar about a year ago (the box set, not the magazine… I have my wonderful folks to thank for that one), and I’ve been a bit obsessed with it after the reissue announcement of the Voyager Golden Record box set (Kickstarter), so let’s just say I was a bit beside myself and had to do a double take upon its random discovery in the Life magazine that had been sitting on our living room table for the better part of three years. Man can step foot on the Moon, but I can’t discover a 47 year old record advertisement sitting beneath my nose. For shame.

Anyway, have a read, then head over to Discogs to nab this essential box set for next to nothing. She’s currently $7.50 for the full set (that’s 6x LPs and a 192 page, hardcover book, kids), and if you’re feeling REALLY interplanetary, back the Voyager Golden Record on Kickstarter. You’ll thank me later.

What Would That Mercury Portable Turntable from 1966 Go for Today?

mercurysmashLet’s play the adjusted for inflation game! A quick bit of internet research nets this advert in the 1966 range, which would bring the “new” AG 4100 model (original price of $39.95) to only $296.98, while the monster, GF 340, with original price of $99.95, to a whopping $743 today. Portable phonographs certainly were a premium during the ol’ British Invasion days, am I right? And I can’t help but think how Smash Records, a company I’ve heard very little about, teamed up with Mercury for this frame-worthy advert. A few clicks back on the ol’ interwebs and as it turns out, Smash Records was a subsidiary of Mercury Records starting in 1961, so, that solves that useless mystery.

Vinyl Me, Insert

vinylMeInsertOk, so I may not love this insert simply because it’s reminiscent of inserts 50 years its junior, although that helps, but what really stands out is its simplistic, yet effective layout, not to mention its frame worthy design. This modern takes on vintage art, recently discovered last night, is just one of the things that makes this shameless collector secretly grin.