1984?

1984 was a symbolic and busy year, for events both unpredictable, and all too obvious. ’84 saw Jerry Lee Lewis surrendering to the feds for evading his income taxes, the year where Simple Minds singer Jim Kerr married Chrissie Hynde from The Pretenders, the year when Red Hot Chili Peppers released their debut album, and even the year where Michael Jackson’s head engulfed into flames during the filming of a Pepsi commercial. Can anyone say free Pepsi for life?! 1984 (Nineteen Eight-Four) is also the title to George Orwell’s dystopian masterpiece (first published in 1949), as well as a feature film starring John Hurt (RIP) released in, you guessed it, 1984. The soundtrack single, showcased here, saw synth-pop masters, Eurythmics performing the track, Sexcrime (Nineteen Eighty-Four). Presented here are both the single version, and the near 8-minute extended version, both perfect for remembering a year when Marvin Gaye was shot and killed by his father, and Bruce Springsteen would release his infamous, Born in the U.S.A. Lots to do… lots to do…

Rocker

This 1984 RCA Records compilation of Elvis Presley material (originally recorded 1956-1957) is part of the label’s Elvis 50th Anniversary Series which is described by RCA as follows: “RCA is proud to present a series of releases designed to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the birth of the King of Rock’n’Roll – Elvis Presley.” Looks like RCA rereleased the bulk of Elvis’ early albums for this series, including his first two, Elvis Presley and Elvis. Rocker is, well, just that. Containing classics like Shake, Rattle & Roll, Hound Dog, Jailhouse Rock, and of course the Carl Perkins masterpiece, Blue Suede Shoes, it’s clear where label execs got the name for this heavy comp.

MCMLXXXIV

1984, Van Halen’s sixth album is a bittersweet masterpiece. It is (one of) the bands’ most commercially successful records (selling 10+ million copies), and was the last (until 2012’s A Different Kind of Truth) to exercise the unquestionable talents of one Mr. David Lee Roth. The home to four, radio-friendly (radio-polluting?) singles, and Van Halen classics (Hot for Teacher, I’ll Wait, Panama, and Jump), it’s no question how 1984 because such a monumental classic, and indisputable staple to the 80s decade. If you haven’t in a while, dust off your smoke-stained copy and serve yourself a platter of glam metal goodness. Your (considerably) younger self will thank you.

I Happen to Have the Lyric Sheet at Home

Have you ever wanted to know the lyrics to Minor Threat’s 1984 compilation, Minor Threat? I mean, let’s be honest here. Of course you have. So, allow me to present this 2008 reissue of the original lyric sheet-insert-type-deal. In the bit of research I’ve done on this release, there appears to be several different versions of the cover, some of the early versions fetching a hefty sum. This version was purchased used up in Ventura some 8-or-so years back, not that that matters, but the point is, really, that Minor Threat’s compilation, Minor Threat, is an absolute must-own. Carry on.

F is for Foreigner

Oh, Foreigner. 1984’s Agent Provocateur housed this New York band’s biggest hit, both in the UK and the US, with I Want to Know What Love is. The hype sticker speaks for itself. Oh, Agent Provocateur, that’s the one with I Want to Know What Love is, yeah? Yes, sir or ma’am. You are correct. If you’re unsure, or just need confirmation, you can acquire the definition of love, via means of Foreigner (oh, Foreigner) for as little as a dime from Discogs. No lie! Check out this link. This shit is cheap!

Picture the Sun

In 1984, Rhino Records, with exclusive license from Sun International Corporation, released this beautiful Greatest Hits album as a radiant picture disc. Long gone were the rights to Elvis, but each of the other legendary Sun Records icons are present. Roy Orbison doing Ooby Dooby, Carl Perkins doing Honey Don’t and Blue Suede Shoes, Billy Lee Riley doing Red Hot, Junior Parker with Feelin’ Good and Mystery Train, Jerry Lee Lewis with Great Balls of Fire and Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On, and of course, Johnny Cash with Folsom Prison Blues. It’s worth owning even if picture discs are prone to skip (and they are).

Shock of Daylight

Unexpected gifts in the form of records that accompany online purchases are, for some reason, happening more and more frequently. As I scour Discogs for random-ass one-offs and obscure Wax Trax! releases, more frequently now are sellers throwing in additional, random records with my purchases. This has happened a handful of times now, and I’m pleasantly surprised by the results. The Sound and their 1984 EP Shock of Daylight is the newest freebie to cross our threshold. Thank you, random Discogs seller. We’ll now enjoy six tracks of pure, new wave bliss. Free music just, somehow, tastes better, don’tcha think?

Mystic Records Wants Your Money

In randomly admiring the back cover to the 1984 Mystic Records comp, Mystic Sampler #1, I noticed a few key things. I present them in no particular or chronological order. 1) Discogs doesn’t have an entry for Slamulation, the comp album on which the original Suicidal Tendencies line-up released their early track, I Saw Your Mommy (also featured here). 2) There is a red vinyl version of Mystic Sampler #1 (Wantlisted). 3) The cover art to the Mystic Records cover compilation is the only advertised record NOT featured on this back sleeve. The only cover without a cover, is an album about covers.

Solid Gold

In all my Wax Trax! Records collecting days, I’ve never seen a gold version of the iconic logo. Not sure why it’s taken me so long to secure WAX005, A Popular History of Songs’ 1984 effort, Ladder Jack, but neatly affixed to the back cover of said EP is this glittering gem. I’m a sucker for logos, if you haven’t figured that out, and beside the Grand Royal Records logo, this one may take the cake.

I Feel For You

feelChaka Khan feels for us, guys. This is, obviously, very exciting news! By the looks of things, she’s been feeling for us since 1984, or so Warner Bros. Records would like us to believe. I for one am both not surprised and pleasantly pleased about this new found observation, and with the holiday coming up, we could all use a little more feelings from Chaka Khan, am I right?

Post No. 1000 – Early Inspiration

MusicBookI’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately about which record, song, or band related article of clothing could be worthy of the 1000th post milestone. I’d thought about an elaborate photo shoot involving mannequins, mood lighting, and every colored vinyl record I own, but quickly abandoned that scheme due to time and budget. So instead, I’m reaching back… WAY back to my elementary school years to one my most prized possessions, 1984’s The Music Book.

My grade school had a music house, an old, free-standing building acquired by the administration which was converted into a large singing and instrument-practicing box. From kindergarten through 6th grade, I’d shuffle across the street with my coworkers (classmates) and we’d put on our color-coded name tags and learn about the wondrous world of music. In the early years, before poorly attempting my hand (and lungs) at the alto sax, we’d sing various songs from the purple bible known as The Music Book. Rife with colorful illustrations and catchy, young crowd-pleasing songs, The Music Book sat in a long row on the North wall of the music house, and each grubby little troublemaker would grab one before taking his or her assigned seats. Our teacher, the lovely and talented Mrs. Fenske, would take roll call, then requests for which song the class wanted to sing first. At the Court of King Carraticus, It’s All Right to Cry, and The Lollipop Tree were all crowd favorites, and often sung every day. Carraticus

Now, I’m not sure if it was youthful innocence, the comic-like illustrations, or the music itself, but for a bunch of us, The Music Book meant so much more than just another text book. It represented a blameless and simple era of our lives inspired by the art of noise, and served as an open door to a lifelong appreciation for the medium. Because I’m a sentimental sap, I hold this book very dear to my heart. It is a symbol of purity, of animated gaiety, and I look back at that time with fervent admiration. For my love of music, I have Mrs. Fenske and The Music Book to thank. Tree

Ain’t No Disco Duck!

DeesNovelties and Rick Dees tended to go together back in the collar-popping 80s like disco and ducks. While the majority of radio-listening ‘Merica knows ol’ Dees for The Weekly Top 40, those select, demented few among us know him for Disco Duck, and those lonely, pathetic among us know him for his early 80s comedy albums. Released in 1984, this (anything but) Orwellian approach to subjects like glue sniffing, shorts-eating, and candid phone conversations (with mainstays of the day, Julio Iglesias and Michael Jackson) make Put it Where the Moon Don’t Shine something of a, let’s say “interesting” listen. Clearly capitalizing on his radio popularity, this album was actually not, I repeat, NOT a one-off, as it was the follow-up to his 1983 debut, Hurt Me Baby Make Me Write Bad Checks! I don’t have that one, but the cover alone makes me consider hunting it down. Disco Duck on the other hand…

It’s Just My Legs

TinaI never knew Ike, but as an adolescent fan of 80s pop radio (Madison, Wisconsin’s Z-104), I knew Tina Turner. I knew her for asking the simple, yet tough questions in life, like, what’s love got to do with it, and what’s love but second hand emotion? I still haven’t 100% figured that out, but I’m forced to humbly accept that fact.

LegsReleased in the Orwellian year of our lord, 1984, Private Dancer was hugely successful for this pop dragon, and proved to be one of Tina’s best selling albums (selling over 5 million copies). Four Grammy wins for Private Dancer, and this majestic beast would be forever cemented into the sponge-like minds of rural Wisconsin’s youth.

Buy the Ticket, Ride the Lightning

LightningIt’s difficult to comprehend that Ride the Lighting was released in 1984, or at least it’s a bit of a challenge for me to wrap my head around since I was only five at the time. When you consider the big, radio-friendly tracks de jour were Karma Chameleon, Girls Just Want to Have Fun, Footloose, What’s Love Got to Do with It, and When Doves Cry, tracks like Trapped Under Ice, Creeping Death, and Fight Fire with Fire seem to resemble a refreshing iceberg floating amongst a sea of raging-radio hell. I didn’t go to the local shop expecting to Ride the Lighting, but for a cool $12, this guy here has his ticket in hand.