5

5One can never turn down a Motown presentation, especially when its offered up by Diana Ross. 1969 saw a lot of things, and among them was the first studio release from The Jackson 5, Diana Ross Presents The Jackson 5. I won’t got into details so much as to say, this is essential listening material for both historical, and pleasure purposes.

Also Available from Telstar

MJIt’s not very often, in fact, this is the first time it’s happened, that one reaches for a Marvin Gaye album, and runs across a back cover ad for a random-ass Michael Jackson comp record. Titled 18 Greatest Hits, this 1983 release featuring 18 mega hits from Michael Jackson & The Jackson 5 can be had for a cool $0.71 on LP, and an acceptable $4.22 on cassette (courtesy of Discogs.com). I was all set and ready to dig into the untimely death of Marvin Gaye when I stumbled across this little 23-year-old gem. Rediscovering my collection by means of this medium has proven to be a hilarious and boisterous experience. I think I’m finally starting to dig it. Also available on cassette.

Ain’t No Disco Duck!

DeesNovelties and Rick Dees tended to go together back in the collar-popping 80s like disco and ducks. While the majority of radio-listening ‘Merica knows ol’ Dees for The Weekly Top 40, those select, demented few among us know him for Disco Duck, and those lonely, pathetic among us know him for his early 80s comedy albums. Released in 1984, this (anything but) Orwellian approach to subjects like glue sniffing, shorts-eating, and candid phone conversations (with mainstays of the day, Julio Iglesias and Michael Jackson) make Put it Where the Moon Don’t Shine something of a, let’s say “interesting” listen. Clearly capitalizing on his radio popularity, this album was actually not, I repeat, NOT a one-off, as it was the follow-up to his 1983 debut, Hurt Me Baby Make Me Write Bad Checks! I don’t have that one, but the cover alone makes me consider hunting it down. Disco Duck on the other hand…