Pennywiser

Cheers to another pop-punk band doing another groovy beer. This time, Pennywise and their collab with Lost Coast Brewery appropriately titled, Pennywiser. I’ve yet to try it, but it appears to be a modest or “easy drinking” session IPA, and if my sources are correct, has a limited release dating back to last September. For a full list of participating venues, have a hop over to the band’s official site here. Cheers.

(No) Space

The real estate market within my library is growing increasingly scarce. This unfortunate fact has made me second, third, and fourth guess my vagrant decisions to grant specific records access to this congested population. I mean, would I really keep Ace Cannon’s Memphis Golden Hits if it wasn’t for the gaudy cover? Or how about two copies of Asia’s Alpha, not to mention (by mentioning) 8 copies of Sean Lennon’s debut, Into the Sun… well, that one seems viable, but still! All of these one-offs start to add up, and before anyone is the wiser, space becomes a great concern.

(Taboo) (Taboo)

Good things often come in pairs… socks, cocktails, pears, and as far as I’m concerned, exotic bird caws and mysterious xylophone melodies are no different. Presented here are Arthur Lyman’s 1958 smash Taboo, and his 1960 follow up, Taboo Vol. 2. The former had been sitting in the collection for three or so years, but the latter just showed up at our doorstep (he shudders in the attempts to contain his excitement). Now, I’m slowly beginning to realize that drunken bird calls aren’t necessarily for everyone (though I’m not entirely sure why), but both Taboo volumes do a phenomenal job of uplifting the listener to bygone nights of exotic, island bliss (think dirty feet, tiki torches, and a lot of rum). For you newbies, start with Taboo (obviously), and when you’re ready for that perfect paired compliment, hunt down Vol. 2. Like with all other space age pop albums, the exotic sounds of Arthur Lyman come highly recommended.

src Fail

For those of you unsavory types who missed out on the ocean blue double vinyl version of the Mondo Jaws soundtrack, you’ve got an overpriced chance to acquire a copy over at srcvinyl. That’s right! For a cool $54.99, you could be the proud owner of the black vinyl version, for roughly a third more than the original retail cost of the ocean blue version. Upon closer examination over at src, it appears this item’s preorder description offers conflicting information… Unless there are varying degrees of darkness (“none more black”), how could a 180 gram black colored vinyl record be described as “Limited double 180gm colored vinyl LP pressing” ??? Somebody better fix that shit!

Back to Life, Back to Reality

Unsure how to start the new year, I’ll give a quick shout out to our trusty portable, the Numark PT-01 USB. If ever you’re looking for a rugged portable that plays 33 1/3s, 45s, and 78s, this is your machine. She runs on 6x D batteries, and if you’re serious, I suggest investing in EBL rechargeable batteries and the EBL Universal Charger. Well worth the money, on all accounts.

Stereo Now!

Give the benevolent gift of stereo this holiday season with Capitol Records’ New Improved Full Dimensional Stereo. It “sounds better than stereo has ever sounded before,” and it’s available “on all new capitol stereo discs.” With new “bite” to the brass, “impact” in the percussion, and crisp clarity you’d find only in a thrilling live performance, Capitol’s stereo recordings are a heavenly gift, perfect for any and every collector. Ask your dealer for more information, or write your congressperson.

Let’s Listen

If you’re in the mood for a legs-up causal evening, alone, with loved ones, or even those you’d like to begin loving, try a few halves of Harry Arnold and his Orchestra as they elegantly and seductively jam through 12-tracks of Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers favorites on Let’s Listen, released by Mercury Records. Though the year is unknown, I’d guess and say this is a 1956 release, give or take a few years. Check it out if you can find it.

Touch Dancing…

Well, it’s back, at least, according to this International Jazz release by Enoch Light and His Orchestra. It’s hard to imagine that touch dancing ever really went away, but that’s just, you know, my opinion. Appropriately titled Touch Dancing is Back, Enoch Light (and his crew) bring 10 tracks of pure, lustful touch dancing favorites like, Laughing on the Outside, I’ll Get You, and I Get Ideas. Whether you’re in the mood, or trying to plan a soft, rhythmic evening with your touch partner, consider Touch Dancing is Back. You won’t be disappointed.

I’ve Got A Plan

This is what I told my wife… I’ve got a plan. No, it’s not a secret plan to fight inflation, but instead a plan to emerge from chaos with strict, binary organization. The plan worked, I’ll have you know, but please notice a few things during this, my “transition” period… an age that lasted something like four hours. The most obvious is the Dead Cross LP. I’d just finished spinning that when this moment was stolen from time. There’s a TMBG Flood CD, Rocket from the Crypt dice, the Boss DR-5, two unopened sixers of NOFX’s punk in drublic beer, and of course, the Alternative Tentacles “What would Jello do?” bumper sticker. All things, somewhat music related, that have now found a new home. Cheers to being OCD!

DC

Super excited for a few reasons here. One, that my copy of Dead Cross came in record time (no pun intended). Two, because I’m able to spin yet another collab between Slayer mainstay Dave Lombordo and golden throat magician Mike Patton. And finally, three, because Ipecac Recordings (Patton’s label) releases their records with digital download cards. Lots to be excited about.

One in a Million

Another fantastic Mary Tyler Moore cover, this time touting Lew Raymond and the Hollywood Studio Orchestra. From what I can quickly gather, Mary appears on 7+ album covers from the late 50’s to the early 60’s. Million Sellers is our third, behind Cha Cha Cha and Miguelito Valdez Plays His World Famous Latin Rhythms. Always an exciting find, Mary covers are a sign of space-age-rhythmic-eruptions only the late 50’s can provide. RIP Laura Petrie.

The Music America Loves Best (1951 Version)

By 1951, RCA Victor Records had released enough records to fill a 280 page catalog. This is a fact. From “A” You’re Adorable (47-2899, 1949) by Perry Como to Zigeunerweisen, Op. 20 (LCT-1002, year unknown), RCA’s entire production could be found in clear black and white, and as the catalog itself suggests, “The records in the Request Catalog (not pictured here) your dealer will order for you, gladly and promptly.” So dig in and mosey on down to your brick and mortar for some great RCA Victor releases!