Live from the Crypt

rftc-show-studio-city-11x17-poster-v2-520So, here’s a show, a live, musical performance by my favorite band… in the city with which I live… and I, unfortunately, and with an honest heart, doubt I’ll be able to make it. What’s the killer… IT’S DAMN FREE! Find yourself in the Studio City area on a random Thursday evening looking for boots, mosey on down to Studio City and check out only the greatest rock n’ roll band and live performance of all time.

Gimme that Burzootie, Baby

burzootieWell, it’s Tuesday, and it has felt like a Friday for the past three weeks. So, among other things much less noteworthy, let’s, at least for a moment, give an awkward nod to MCA & Burzootie (Adam Yauch and Jay Burnett) on their 1985 12″ Drum Machine. Once a sought after trophy in the Beastie Boys display case, and understandably, this borderline schizophrenic three track 12″ is post-post-hardcore, pre-License to Ill MCA, and is more than demanding of this, or any Tuesday night’s delicious spins. Spin with caution, and spin often.

The Now Sound Orchestra Strikes Back

newsoundThe name looks right, at least, familiar, but the characters on the cover… not exactly sure what’s going on here. More disco than initially expected, the Now Sound Orchestra’s flamboyant interpretations of classic, sci-fi favorites is something, SHOULD be something, worthy of this amazing cover art. A classic, ready for reevaluation. You’re welcome.


ssinglesI was a little surprised to discover that I’d not touched upon arguably one of the greatest singles compilations ever to emerge from the early 1980s… Singles – 45’s and Under by Squeeze. She was my first introduction to the band, and I thought little to nothing about it upon first spin. Now, she’s one of my top 20 all-time releases. Copies are cheap, so if you find one, snatch it up!

From Rags to Bitches

ragsYou know, when one gets older, one finds the inherent need to dibble-dabble in the piano rag greatness of Scott Joplin, as delightfully depicted by pianist, Joshua Rifkin on Nonesuch Records’ 1970 release. I guess, nothing else needs saying, after that prominent display. Please do carry on about your Thursday evening. Cheers.

Hanna Can’t Wait

img_9706Forgot to post this last night. I’ll screen grab offers from time to time so as not to forget to order an essential record. Case in point, this “official” (non promo) release of the Hanna soundtrack by the Chem Bros. $30+ for a single record release is a bit steep, but when she’s limited to only 1500 copies, the decision is a no-brainer.

Sasquatch Rock

sasquatchrockLawndale’s 2nd (and final) LP (from SST Records in 1987) continued carrying the burning torch of surf-folk rock set ablaze by 1986’s Beyond Barbecue (their debut). Sasquatch Rock, as it is infamously known, harbors many well known, Liquid Kitty favorites, and is the perfect blend of Pacific Coast casual that this prominent band is eminently known for. I could go for a bit of Punk Rock BBQ right about now. (sigh)

“… if you don’t move to this one, then you’re dead.”

campus1967’s Belafonte on Campus is a modest collection of college touring favorites played on a then forty school, forty day tour. It’s often easy to overlook the power of folk music on North American youth throughout the murky turmoil that surrounded the late 1960s. Mr. Belafonte was first and foremost a man of the people, and his profound followers filled assembly halls and auditoriums to capacity (in some cases beyond), and Belafonte on Campus is a must listen for any fan of music history, and / or prolific performers. “… if you don’t move to this one, then you’re dead.” – William A. Attaway, Belafonte on Campus back cover.

The Summa Cum Laude…

cl909… of high fidelity, or so Columbia Records claims, circa: 1956. At a time when many lesser-than labels were pushing “high fidelity” as more of a general, blanket statement rather than something that could necessarily be guaranteed, Columbia felt the incessant urge to mark themselves above all others with their “360” SOUND symbol. Have a read below from the majestic wonders of “360” SOUND, in Columbia’s own words (as found on the back of Paul Weston and His Music from Hollywood’s Moonlight Becomes You):

The symbol “360” SOUND is the summa cum laude of high fidelity.

It is your GUARANTEE that each record so designated has been engineered and individually tested under the supervision of the Columbia Sound Laboratory.

Starting with the taping of the performance, through strategically placed wide-range microphones, every step in the manufacturing process is checked for peak efficiency — including an actual laboratory-calibrated playback of each disc before it is released.

Not only original masters, but stamper test-pressings are required to match, in A-B tests, the tapes from which they were derived.

Only such rigid control permits production of recordings covering the entire 30 to 15,000 cycle range within a plus or minus 2-decibel tolerance.

Like the 360 degrees of a perfect circle, “360” SOUND is the true spectrum of high fidelity.

For this reason Columbia Records, the oldest name in recording and creator of “Lp”, GUARANTEES without reservation the fidelity of this “360” SOUND record.

Editor’s note: Hot damn!