Keep it Up

At one point in my record collecting life I found it necessary to procure Loverboy’s 1983 album, Keep It Up. Though it was a huge success and produced three, radio-friendly singles (Strike Zone, Hot Girls in Love, and Queen of the Broken Hearts), I can’t tell you that I’ve ever listened to it. Perhaps one, lonely, initial spin upon its $0.99 thrift store purchase, but I can’t say for absolute certainty. Time to give her a shot.

Ground

A Good Ground was released in 2005 and, as far as I can tell, was the first studio album released on vinyl by Brooklyn indie Gods, Oxford Collapse. Though not as pleasing to the ear as 2006’s Remember the Night Parties (my first introduction to the band), Ground is solid angst music, heavy on rhythmic glee. These guys were really good. It’s just too bad the rest of the world didn’t think so.

The Lag

My copy of Putting Music in its Place box set doubles as a “catch-all” for all my Lagwagon schwag. Well, to be honest, the only element NOT from the 519 releases of the colored, 10x vinyl box set that IS “personally” original is the printed ticket from the only Lagwagon show I’ve ever witnessed (January 17, 2015 at The Fonda here in LA). Anyway, for a band with so much personal history, and the perfect release to reflect that, it’s always fun to trip down Memory Ln.

Mystic Records Wants Your Money

In randomly admiring the back cover to the 1984 Mystic Records comp, Mystic Sampler #1, I noticed a few key things. I present them in no particular or chronological order. 1) Discogs doesn’t have an entry for Slamulation, the comp album on which the original Suicidal Tendencies line-up released their early track, I Saw Your Mommy (also featured here). 2) There is a red vinyl version of Mystic Sampler #1 (Wantlisted). 3) The cover art to the Mystic Records cover compilation is the only advertised record NOT featured on this back sleeve. The only cover without a cover, is an album about covers.

The Two

I’ve been going back and forth between these two albums over the past few days. They couldn’t be any more different in style, but they both hold important positions in my personal history. One one hand, you’ve got White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean (not the original title… this is the PG version) which takes me back to my high school years, and The Best of the Statler Brothers, which takes me back even further to my adolescent years. “Going back” is the theme, I suppose, and both are adequate vehicles by which to travel. It’s good to have options, I suppose.

Process 70’s France

Hop an intercontinental flight with Bob & Susan and journey through the provocative streets of Paris on this Process 70 Series 2000 easy listening day-trip from Gorden Jenkins and His Orchestra. Simply titled France, this Time Records stereo release is courageous in its approach to bringing the listener “in” to the French experience. Complete with between-song sound effects and comical dialogue (circa: 1962), you, the listener, can piggyback through the wondrous sounds (no sights, kids… this is a record, remember) of an actual French vacation… given that the vacation isn’t yours and you’re subject to the predestined locations that strategically complement the next song to spill from your living room speakers (or kitchen, I don’t know where you keep your stereo set-up… no judgements here). Check it out. It’s certainly not an everyday listen, but it’s a hell of a lot of fun.

Have a Laugh

Go ahead. Have a laugh. It’s Friday! Enjoy some Richard Pryor, some Steve Martin, some Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, or even some Marx Brothers (featured here). In fact, listen to whatever makes you laugh out loud, be it the latest Kid Rock album, or maybe some goofy They Might Be Giants (The Prudent Groove does not actually suggest you listen to Kid Rock). Happy Friday, and don’t forget to laugh!

Sonic Workshop

Motion in Percussion, people! Get into the super-sonic-spaced-out-stereophonic sound with The Hollywood ‘Pops’ Symphony and their 1958 (or 1959) release, Motion in Percussion and Orchestra. Sonic Workshop (the label) does an “astounding” job of selling the visual experience with their stereophonic albums (of which there are only a handful). For all its scientific advances and groundbreaking recording techniques, it simply comes down to one fact: how damn good is the music? Motion in Percussion and Orchestra in no way disappoints, and is perfect party-pop fodder for even the casual SAP (Space Age Pop) listener. Highly recommended.

See Elsewhere for Details

I broke down and got the newly released Ok Computer OKNOTOK triple blue vinyl reissue. As the hype sticker details about OKNOTOK 1997 2017 (still a bit unsure on the proper title), “LIMITED EDITION BLUE VINYL Triple 180g LP containing the original album, three unreleased tracks and eight B-sides, all newly remastered from original analogue tapes. Includes a download code”. So, there you have it. If a triple blue vinyl release of Radiohead’s most sought after album isn’t worth your $40, I’m not sure what would be.