Hysteria

It’s been an Hysteria type of week, to say the least. Lucky for me, I’m able to revert to my 7-year-old self with this award winning, childhood favorite collection of (hard and / or arena) rock pop songs. Not only is this iconic (and at the time VERY futuristic) album cover branded into my brain, it’s also a staple of what shit was hot back in summer of 1987. If you’re one of those living-under-a-rock types, then you’ve likely not heard this monumental and critically acclaimed album… and you certainly should. For the rest of us, I pose a question: When was the last time you rocked out in your P-Jams to Pour Some Sugar On Me? Well, it’s about damn time.

Vital Idolatry

billyThis 1987 reissue of the 1985 compilation of the same name features on its US release an extra track (To Be a Lover), and an alternate track order, but still features, like its older original, massively successful remixes of the chart-topping singles from Billy’s first three albums. Songs like, Mony Mony, Hot in the City, Dancing with Myself, and both parts to White Wedding help make for a very enjoyable, slightly edgy spin (in that pop, mid-1980s type of way), and does its job of perfectly capturing the rock-synth-pop radio-friendly hits of this bygone era. One doesn’t hear much from Billy these days, but we’ll always have our White Wedding.

Sasquatch Rock

sasquatchrockLawndale’s 2nd (and final) LP (from SST Records in 1987) continued carrying the burning torch of surf-folk rock set ablaze by 1986’s Beyond Barbecue (their debut). Sasquatch Rock, as it is infamously known, harbors many well known, Liquid Kitty favorites, and is the perfect blend of Pacific Coast casual that this prominent band is eminently known for. I could go for a bit of Punk Rock BBQ right about now. (sigh)

Goldrush

One SecondIn Switzerland, millionaire industrialists join electro-pop, synth-jazz bands and release inspirational 80’s masterpieces. Case in point, 1987’s One Second from Yello. While the album may be most notable for its inclusion of the 1985 romp Oh Yeah, it’s Goldrush that’s really a chief standout. For a good, non-Ferris Bueller examples of Yello, have a watch at the below video for Goldrush. Remember, this is 1987 Switzerland, and mainstream pop for Mercury Records circa: 1987. Oh yeah, enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_ITf7u4XRA&list=RDG_ITf7u4XRA

1987

LiveIn 1987, I was 8. Also in 1987, Revolting Cocks released their heart-stopping live album, the double-trouble LP, You Goddamned Son of a Bitch. This album was recorded some 170 miles south of the rural, tumbleweed-rolling town I rode my GT Vertigo BMX around. Now, some 29 years later, this video documentation holds court within our humble library . Historical brilliance needs preserving, and this release was done up right.

I Will Refuse

PailheadIn 1987, industrial-metal pioneers, the illustrious Ministry, teamed up with straight-edge mogul, Ian MacKaye (of Minor Threat and Fugazi), for an ambitious, yet magnificently executed collection of hardcore punk-industrial hybrids. Calling themselves Pailhead, the short-lived supergroup released six tracks over three releases and a comp. Featured here is their first record, well, the 12″ version of it, titled I Will Refuse. It’s not surprising that the record received both a 12″ and 7″ release, catering towards both the industrial (12″) and punk crowds (7″) respectively. Swap out MacKaye for Jello Biafra, add a few years (1989), and you’ve got LARD, another, more long-lasting venture into the punk-industrial genre that these Pailhead fools almost single-handedly established. It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty damn close. Check ’em out.

Nitzer Sliced

EBBEBM… a former roommate introduced me to Nitzer Ebb, and I thank you explicitly, Tricia. This $3 necessity was had from a little hallway of a record shop across the street from Nick Nice’s shop in Madison, WI. This is the humble shop where I acquired my first Revolting Cocks record… where I snatched the Hot Snakes debut, the Lenny Soundtrack, the O Brother, Where Art Thou? Soundtrack, and Johnny Cash’s American IV… needless to say, $3 for Ebb’s debut, however mangled, was a bargain, given the circumstances. Covers be damned, until the time in which they be praised.