Brothers and Sisters

AllBroMy knowledge of The Allman Brothers Band could fill a mid-century Social Studies textbook, assuming said textbook was completely blank. I know nothing of this band outside their infrequently played radio hit, Ramblin’ Man. Acquiring this album because it was (to me) a cover to a They Might Be Giants song, Jessica. Turns out, I had my starting and end points a bit skewed. Brothers and Sisters is fine, casual, late August, early September, autumnal soundtrack fodder, or something of the like.

Stir It Up

FireThis particular copy of Bob Marley and the Wailers’ fifth studio album, 1973’s Catch A Fire must have endured considerable play by the original owner, as this sleeve is absolutely filthy. Record hygiene must have been completely abandoned leaving me to feel the incessant need to scrub my mitts every time I give her a spin. I wonder, to myself, obviously, what would be a proper cleaning solution to clean album covers.

Smith, Mr. Aero Smith

SmithWell, it was only a matter of time until we got to the Steven Tyler-led, 70s monarch, Aerosmith. Hard rock, for the ears of fans who only knew soft rock (I apologize to no one), Aerosmith cemented their historic, decade-looming monument with 1973’s Dream On, although it didn’t receive commercial appreciation until its 1976 re-release, and although my interaction with the band didn’t “officially” occur until the mid-sorry-nineties, one growing up in rural Wisconsin does not go a casual day and not stumble across a bit of Aerosmith, in whatever iteration that plop-cultured medium deemed fit.