Credit

It was a sad 10-15 years after the release of R.E.M.’s epic Automatic for the People that I finally realized that Led Zeppelin bassist and multi-instrumentalist John Paul Jones contributed orchestral arrangements on Drive, the award-winning Everybody Hurts, The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonight, and Nightswimming… which represent a good 1/4 of the album. If you’ve got it, and haven’t spun it in a while, have another listen and keep an ear out for Jones’ work. There’s a bit more comfort within these arrangements now that the full picture is in view, at least, from the perspective of these ears. Plus, it’s an excuse to relive your 1992 years. You’re welcome.

Auto People

Back when I had only a handful of compact discs (I’m about back down to that number “these days”), I owned both 1991’s Out of Time, and 1992’s Automatic for the People, both, obviously essential R.E.M. albums. The CD case for this release was made from bright, neon yellow plastic, which neatly matched the neon yellow disc inside. Now, keep in mind that this was a time when the plastic case disc holder was a standard charcoal gray, so ANYTHING different demanded our Jr. High attention, at least, so we thought. Anyway, an obvious inclusion to this or any library, I strongly recommend picking up a copy, in the format of your choosing (Compact Disc, LP, Cassette, HDCD, DVD-A, and Minidisc are known to exist).

The Phar Cyde: A Personal Original

I was so excited upon discovering this (cheap-ass) reissue of The Pharcyde’s Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde, that I didn’t even care it was housed in a generic white, Delicious Vinyl sleeve. Up to this point (sometime in 1998), I’d only had this classic album’s cassette and compact disc releases, and had never even seen a copy of the original on vinyl, then, only six years old. The original is still missing from the collection, but this “personal original” houses a special place within the collection. File this under “one of the first 50 records owned.”

Gordon

It only took them 25 damn years, but the debut album by Barenaked Ladies now has a much-deserved plot of real estate on the library wall. Gordon, which was released in compact disc and cassette form way back in 1992, finally received its first vinyl pressing late last year. I’m a bit surprised that there weren’t any color variants for this monumental release, but the fact that it exists on vinyl at all is something worth celebrating, and deserving of my $17. It’s just a bit of a bummer that they didn’t use the original cover.

Rage Against the Clock

I’ve all but forgotten about Rage Against the Machine these days, but that certainly wasn’t always the case. Their first two studio albums, 1992’s Rage Against the Machine (this) and 1996’s Evil Empire were on constant (near non-stop) rotation during my searching (high school) years. It’s rather difficult to listen to either album and not think of my 13-year-old self riding bikes and shooting hoops… to a steady stream of damn good music (311, NOFX, Ministry, Operation Ivy, and Faith No More come to mind). I broke out Rage the other day after a decades-long hiatus, and it still sounds just as bit as perfect as it did to my adolescent and foolish ears some 26 years ago. Carry that torch, kids.

Gold

Gold is a single-sided 7″ released by Drunken Fish Records (Santa Monica, CA) back in the summer of 1992. It contains one song, Gold, and was limited to 500 copies. The name of the band is Rocket from the Crypt, and although the color in the photo is a bit misleading, the sleeve is actually red, while the record is actually a yellow-ish, gold-like color. This copy, just obtained, came with Mardi Gras-esque beads, as it did upon its initial release some 25 years ago, though I have reason to question the legitimacy of these beads. No matter, as we’re now one step closer to completing the (never-ending) Rocket from the Crypt discography!

I Think it’s Booty, That’s What it Is

An interesting 12″ promo in this 1992 double-sided, same-track Beastie Boys release of the “non-single” Professor Booty. Obtained more as a completed checklist box than anything else, my Check Your Head singles collection is now at 100%. Why The Skills to Pay the Bills wasn’t on Check Your Head, or why it didn’t receive a proper (or even promo) single release (especially over Professor Booty), will never make sense to me. Anyway, that’s my issue. Don’t worry about me. Carry on.

Frozen Metal Head

This EP has eluded me for long enough. A UK only release, 1992’s Frozen Metal Head features two versions of Jimmy James (the Single Version and the Original Original Version), a remix of the single So What’ Chat Want, and the instrumental, Drinkin’ Wine. Though the pressing info isn’t known, she’s housed within a solid white vinyl casing, and sounds perfect to virgin ears. This EP comes highly recommended.

Ya Mama 2.0

v2Next in line in The Pharcyde Singles Collection is another Ya Mama pair, but this time of the J-Swift persuasion. Remix on side A, and an instrumental on side B, this 2nd in line (of 7) maintains the rambunctious bursts from yesterday’s starter, but ups the ante in terms of initial productivity. 7 records, kids… long live The Pharcyde.

Pro-Analog, Anti-Government

Pomade

Haven’t listened to it yet, but the latest addition to the virus of a collection is the 1992 split from Rocket from the Crypt and Dead Bolt titled, Smells Like Grease for Peace. One more record to check off the RFTC checklist, and one more that wasn’t gobbled up by the strict and deviant void that is the United States Postal Service. Still waiting on my Time Hardin and Rocket 45s, you rat-bastards!

Violet Vomit

PurpleNOFX’s fourth chronological album was actually the third album in the autobiographical sense. Not that this matters in any capacity, but upon discovering White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean, I’d found that the band’s rhetoric sounded much more polished and mature than, what I THOUGHT was their previous offering (and my first introduction to the band), 1994’s Punk in Drublic. Well, I was wrong… clearly. To this day I still stutter-step when mentally placing this band’s large output in any discernible order, and every time, White Trash trips me up. This nonsensical rant certainly does nothing to undercut the severity of this amazing album, and should (probably) be forgotten as soon as humanly possible (preferably sooner). Happy Friday!