Low Calorie Jello

Santa Ana kicked some solid ass and brought out some heavy, legendary hitters. Featured here is (insane / genius / crazy person) Jello Biafra with his Guantanamo School of Medicine. For only $20, we witnessed not only the best live band of our generation (Rocket from the Crypt), but also a few Dead Kennedys classics. I wasn’t expecting, or remotely prepared for the latter. Good day, indeed.

Venus Envy

venusenvyFat Wreck Chords’ subsidiary, Honest Don’s Records, was a heavy-spun favorite back in my early college days. Diesel Boy’s Strap on Seven Inch (a 7″, naturally) was my first introduction to the snotty Santa Rosa band, and I’ve been (nostalgically) hooked ever since. Venus Envy is the band’s second studio album, and just arrived on my doorstep. If you know a Don, keep him honest. If you don’t, have your way over here.

Music for Dirt, Peacocks, and Fire

IMG_7806The below list is, we feel, adequate camping music for the inner, nature-minded ruffian in all of us. A few old standbys, a few personal favs, but all helping to create a calming soundtrack for our recent, peacock-screaming nature excursion. I’d be interested to hear what others would consider like-minded, camping-acceptable albums.

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Willy and the Poor Boys

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Cosmo’s Factory

Jim Croce – I Got A Name

ZZ Top – First Album

John Fahey – The Dance of Death & Other Plantation Favorites Volume 3

Booker T. & the MG’s – Green Onions

Michael Bloomfield / Al Kooper / Steve Stills – Super Session

The Beatles – The Kinfaun Demos

The Kinks – Muswell Hillbillies

Essential Reading Material

When camping, I find a good book helps to set the calming, relaxing, slow-paced vibe of living like a pampered homeless person. I just cracked open NOFX’s The Hepatitis Bathtub and Other Stories, and it’s absolutely, without question, batshit crazy… in the best, possible sense of the term. Anyway, no records this round. Just ZZ Top’s first album over the iPod, good company, and random-ass NOFX stories. Life is good.

Sublimed

SublimeI saw Sublime’s self-titled album at Barnes & Noble recently and I got to thinking, why the hell don’t I own all of their albums yet? I mean, there are only three of them, and I already own their second offering, 1994’s Robbin’ the Hood (featured here). They seem to reissue all three of these with some kind of color variant every few years or so. I think I’m going to jump on the next round, or at least strongly consider it. Sublime was on heavy rotation during my pizza delivery days which was, unfortunately, after frontman Bradley Nowell had passed. A buddy of mine swears we saw them back in 1995 at a Warped Tour, but I think he’s nuts as I would certainly have remembered seeing them. Anyway, as a general rule of thumb, if a band only releases three albums, and you already own one of them, it’s damn time to round out their discography.

Have? Need?

AAlways looking out for my fellow record obsessed, this photo was sent to a Tull-lover, with the simple text of, “Have? Need?” This is not a rare exchange that goes out among our local collecting comrades, and in this case, the $3 needed not be spent. I was however strictly instructed to acquire 1974’s War Child, but in lieu of time, I had to pass it up. (Raises glass), here’s to those to act before asking. Happy Sunday, kids!

D-E-L-I-C-I-O-U-S

YoungMCOne of the two hip hop acquisitions from Saturday’s Wax fair, this sealed Young MC single from 1988: I Let ’em Know backed with My Name is Young. This was a no-brainer as far as historical, LA-based labels are concerned. I’ve not seen many of the standard Delicious sleeves (featured here), instead generally seeing a plain black or white sleeve. Defunct label design aside, tonight I’m going to blast some Young MC while pretending I’m 9 years old again… should make for an interesting evening for my neighbors.

Deception

WAXTreading thin ice here, so as not to bite the hand that feeds, or some type idiom that some deem appropriate here, but the first day of Los Angeles’ record fair dubbed, Wax The Los Angeles Record Fair, was, although wholeheartedly welcomed (obviously), a severe letdown. Yeah, well, what the shit could you have done better, you POS nobody, nothing head! Fair enough, I’d respond. Crosley Records, for one, would have no presence at said event whatsoever. As far as I’m concerned, and usability backs me up, anything sold at Urban Outfitters need not exist within the meticulous and clinically obsessed lives of record collectors, and anywhere they would frequent. I made a point to walk past that (Crosley) booth with a fierce and cool stride not seen in the great county of Los Angeles (Ventura County, well, that’s a horse of another color, altogether). $1200 priced Elvis Presley 45s baking in the Los Angeles heat, bubbling in the shadows of the (outdated) Capitol Records building, to me, does not make any lick of sense. As an aside, where the organization (WAX) and vendor shirt prices are fixed at an already outrageous $20, why, Capitol Records of Los Angeles, CA, are you charging an astronomical $27 for your damn logo on a solid color? The take away from this event was, at least for me: STEAL YOUR MUSIC! Thanks, but you’re fooling no one. If you’re not going to do it right, then please God, almighty… DON’T DO IT AT ALL!

Capitol Red

RedComp albums by the world’s most popular musical act are nothing new, exciting, and / or controversial, but double, colored LPs are a horse of a different color. While going to school up in Ventura, CA some years back, a record store, whose name I cannot recall, went out of business and was celebrating with a storewide ½ off sale. Among some German Simon & Garfunkel, clear vinyl Drive Like Jehu, original pressings of Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, I acquired both this, 1978’s 1962 – 1966, and the blue vinyl sibling, 1967 – 1970 for $10 each. They had a Spinal Tap picture disc displayed on the wall… I wish I’d gotten that guy too. Anyway, there is a time and place for compilation albums. I’ve yet to find that hour and location, but I’m sure they exist.

B-Boy Bouillabaisse

GoThis 1982 live bootleg from the inaugural Beastie Boys years is the most recent addition to the family’s B-Boy Bouillabaisse (Paul’s Boutique… check it out). It was acquired at an LA punk shop off Melrose, and although the quality is less than perfect, it captures a pivotal point in the band’s lucrative history. For what it’s worth, sacred memories need to be celebrated, regardless of how unsocial and mundane they may seem.

RIP MCA.