Midnight Sun

Discovered this 1965 Arthur Lyman record over the weekend, and the Lyman library continues to grow. Titled Call of the Midnight Sun, this Pacific-jazz 12-track’er contains Black Orchid by Cal Tjader, 500 Miles, written by Hedy West and made famous by The Journeymen and Peter, Paul and Mary, and of course, Hello, Dolly, written by Jerry Herman. Like with all Arthur Lyman records, Call of the Midnight Sun comes highly recommended.

Tigers

After about 10 minutes of (deep) internet searching, I discovered that my copy of Simon & Garfunkel’s Sounds of Silence is a second pressing (of the three initial pressings). My copy is the last to feature the Tiger Beat magazine in Art’s jacket pocket. This would be airbrushed out on the third and subsequent pressings. Mine is also a German release, acquired at a storewide going-out-of-business sale some 15 years ago. Copyright states a release date of 1972, some 7 years after the album’s initial release. This doesn’t mean too much, other than now I want to bury myself in Bookends, my personal favorite.

The Return of the L.A. Cowboy

Woah, Nellie! This never before released 6-track EP from 1965 is a much needed breath of fresh air among the cloudy boulevards of smog city. Not since 1981’s Unforgiven (an uncompleted album) have we heard anything new from legendary songwriter Tim Hardin. Forget all the bells and whistles about the 45rpm, limited numbered edition, 180 gram vinyl, blah blah blah… THESE ARE NEVER BEFORE RELEASED SONGS BY TIM (MF) HARDIN! Obtain immediately, and at any price.

Golden

Presented here is, more or less, my latest obsession… Mr. Roger Miller. Mono on the right, stereo on the left, this classic “greatest hits” album can be had for about a quarter online (this doesn’t include shipping, mind you), but you can likely find it in the $1 bin at your local brick and mortar. All the singles are here, Dang Me, Atta Boy Girl, Do-Wacka-Do, In the Summertime, England Swings, Chug-A-Lug, and of course, King of the Road. I’d define Roger Miller as country in name only. He’s more of a goofball with an acoustic guitar any anything resembling Waylon, Johnny, or Willie, which makes him an easy and likable target for those not too fond of the genre as a whole. I guess, if pressed, what I dig most about Mr. Miller is his shining positivity. You can’t roller skate in a buffalo herd, but you can be happy if you’ve a mind to.

It’s Always Jerry

jerryMr. Jerry Vale answered a seemingly endless string of mundane, and inessential questions with the title of his 1965 album, Have You Looked into Your Heart. Odd that there’s not a question mark at the end of this title. Anyway, below is a brief series of questions, adequately answered by this Italian-American legend:

Q: Dammit! I’m late for work… again. Where the hell are my damn keys?
A: Have You Looked into Your Heart?

Q: Why is my toe bleeding?
A: Have You Looked into Your Heart?

Q: How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
A: Have You Looked into Your Heart?

Bring it on Home

3rdWe’ve been sucked into the British Invasion vortex these past few weeks. A relatively calming and energetic state to find oneself, all things considered. On tonight’s rotation is the third studio album from Newcastle’s own, The Animals. Featured here is the 1965 US release on MGM Records titled, Animals Tracks, and as the cover boasts, contains their biggest set yet, but, you tell me… We Gotta Get out of This Place, Bring it on Home to Me, The Story of Bo Diddley, Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, and Bury My Body. Personally, I don’t feel the self-promoting cover claim is anything outside of hot-damn accurate.

Begin Where?

Begin HereI passed on the opportunity to snatch the 2013 Record Store Day reissue of the US version of The Zombies’ debut album (titled The Zombies in the states, Begin Here in the UK). I didn’t think much for the bastardized cover, and although the album is obviously essential listening material, I opted to hold out for the original UK art. At my local hit-or-miss brick-and-mortar the other day I found this amazing gem, a UK import of the 2014 limited edition reissue. If Heinz ketchup has taught me anything, it’s that good things come to those who wait, so I feel I made the educated decision. Plus, this copy sounds flippin’ amazing! Side A is unstoppable, and it’s sad to fathom that this amazing band only lasted for two albums. Next on the “need” list, their 2nd, and last album, 1968’s Odessey and Oracle.