Bahia

(Sigh) Yes, another Arthur Lyman album post. Don’t call it an obsession… call it a fixation of grand proportions. Bahia was one of Lyman’s six (yes, six!) releases from 1959. (Have a look at his discography at Discogs for the details.) Though “more of the same” could be argued, early Lyman records saw more of an adventurous approach from this esteemed island God. Honestly, and this is what I did, if you dig this type of Pacific Space Age Pop, you could nab up the bulk of Lyman’s studio releases for dirt-damn cheap. I’m talking like, $4 a pop if you’re looking in the proper corners. This fixation, I’m sure, will reach its pinnacle, but until then, it’s nothing but exotic bird calls and vibraphone grooves for this coconut-cocktail-sipper.

RSD ’18 Part Two

Presented here is our loot from this year’s Record Store Day. The big three were acquired (listed in order of necessity).

  • Dr. Octagon – Moosebumpectomy: An Excision of Modern Day Instrumentalization
  • Tim Hardin – Lost in L.A.
  • The Kinks – Phobia
  • Van Morrison – The Alternative Moondance
  • Harry Nilsson – Pussy Cats
  • Arthur Lyman – Bahia
  • Leonard Nimoy – Mr. Spock’s Music from Out Space

Leis of Jazz

Vibraphone wizard Arthur Lyman brings his tropical island virtuosity to the smoke-filled cocktail lounge of yesteryear on this nightclub jazz classic, Leis of Jazz. A two drink minimum is the only prerequisite for this dozen of spinnable goodies, featuring The Lady is a Tramp and Lullaby of the Leaves, to name only a few highlights. A little less island and a lot more lounge, Leis of Jazz is a welcoming departure from the rest of Lyman’s esteemed catalog. Mix up another round, spin, and enjoy.

(Taboo) (Taboo)

Good things often come in pairs… socks, cocktails, pears, and as far as I’m concerned, exotic bird caws and mysterious xylophone melodies are no different. Presented here are Arthur Lyman’s 1958 smash Taboo, and his 1960 follow up, Taboo Vol. 2. The former had been sitting in the collection for three or so years, but the latter just showed up at our doorstep (he shudders in the attempts to contain his excitement). Now, I’m slowly beginning to realize that drunken bird calls aren’t necessarily for everyone (though I’m not entirely sure why), but both Taboo volumes do a phenomenal job of uplifting the listener to bygone nights of exotic, island bliss (think dirty feet, tiki torches, and a lot of rum). For you newbies, start with Taboo (obviously), and when you’re ready for that perfect paired compliment, hunt down Vol. 2. Like with all other space age pop albums, the exotic sounds of Arthur Lyman come highly recommended.

Colorful Percussions

Arthur Lyman’s 1962 classic, The Colorful Percussions of Arthur Lyman, is a festive little listen that showcases, yet again, the many and varied talents of this Space Age Pop legend. Sandwiched between 1960’s Percussion Spectatular! (a reissued as Yellow Bird) and Many Moods of Arthur Lyman (also 1962), The Colorful Percussions of Arthur Lyman is as vivid and explosive as the title and cover art suggests. This, like with any Lyman album, comes highly recommended.

Release Date Taboo

It never really dawned on me how damn similar these two album covers were. On the left, Arthur Lyman’s, Taboo, and on the right, The Legend of Pele. Now, what’s interesting, is that the internet can’t get its release dates straight. Some reputable sources are saying Taboo is Lyman’s debut album, released in 1958, while Pele was a 1959 release (with a few additional albums separating the year gap). Other sources are saying Pele was also released in 1958, and that Leis of Jazz (originally thought to have been released in 1959) is actually Lyman’s debut album, being released in 1957. Unfortunately, there is no clear source for this valuable information… give me some time.

Yellow Bird

Originally titled Percussion Spectacular!, Arthur Lyman’s 1961 “haunting melody” track, Yellow Bird, became a major hit, and Percussion Spectacular! would bow to its rereleased name, Yellow Bird. Whatever the hell you call it, L-1004 (catalog tag release name from HiFi Records) is another classic space age pop release by the master of ethereal delight, Mr. Arthur Lyman, and should be strongly considered for your next social gathering.

Puka Shells

I can’t rightfully imagine that many sealed copies of Arthur Lyman’s 1975 album, Puka Shells exist these days. Apart from it being the legend’s last studio album, Puka Shells also serves as an introduction to his talented daughter, Kapiolani Lyman. I’m torn between removing this virgin gem from its 42 year old crypt and keeping it preserved while I hunt down another to spin. The weight of this decision is a taxing one, and will take some time to figure out.

Pele, and the Legend thereof

peleThe carousel of Space Age Pop continues to spin over here at The Prudent Groove. Next up, 1959’s The Legend of Pele from Arthur Lyman. “More birds?” asks my wife as the first tracks spins. Bird sounds were (apparently) a big thing in the late 1950s. Exotic sounds (and covers) of just about every kind were big just before the boom of the sonic British Invasion. This era, and this uncategorizable genre (Space Age Pop is a modern term) is a whirlwind of toe-tapping, bird chirping grooves that screams for unforgotten attention, that which it is currently, and diligently receiving from our cabinet hi-fi.

Cheeky Brilliance

SunsetArthur Lyman just made my list of musically most wanted. His otherworldly album covers from the late 50s are something heavily deserving of frameable art, while his music carries a luscious, easy listening, space-age brilliance rarely found in today’s dollar bin. Hawaiian Sunset, released in 1959, was the followup to his 1958 debut Taboo, another captivating package necessary for any cocktail lounger on a budget. His album covers start to tame-out in the early 60s, but man, these late 50s covers are something of sheer, cheeky brilliance!

HIFI