Seal the Deal

shagHidden beneath a thin shield of formed plastic is Luscious Jackson’s 1994 single, Deep Shag. Released on Grand Royal Records (GR 011), this 4-track 12″ contains three remixes of the single, and the previously unreleased track, Daddy. I own not one, but two sealed copies of this record. Why? I couldn’t for the life of me tell you, especially when they fetch for only $0.98 on Discogs. May have to finally set one of these free today.

Know Your Chicken

chickenSilk screened back cover to Money Mark’s debut 10″ Performing Chicken is a little lost piece of Beastie Boys (related) history that I recently discovered among my mountain of 10″ records this overcast Tuesday morning. From 1994 on Love Kit Records / Fido Speaks Music, Performing Chicken is classic, groovy downbeat with a bit of modern Latin flair. This mini-album is just the perfect tone and length for summer afternoon strolls to the hardware store for nubbins, or a quick trip to Kwik Trip for bagged milk. I’ve not heard anything that Mark Ramos-Nishita has touched that I haven’t fallen in love with, and I encourage you to give it a spin on your next trip to Jewish deli for turkey pastrami.

Sublimed

SublimeI saw Sublime’s self-titled album at Barnes & Noble recently and I got to thinking, why the hell don’t I own all of their albums yet? I mean, there are only three of them, and I already own their second offering, 1994’s Robbin’ the Hood (featured here). They seem to reissue all three of these with some kind of color variant every few years or so. I think I’m going to jump on the next round, or at least strongly consider it. Sublime was on heavy rotation during my pizza delivery days which was, unfortunately, after frontman Bradley Nowell had passed. A buddy of mine swears we saw them back in 1995 at a Warped Tour, but I think he’s nuts as I would certainly have remembered seeing them. Anyway, as a general rule of thumb, if a band only releases three albums, and you already own one of them, it’s damn time to round out their discography.

Pogs

CryptThe cover to the 1994 reissue of RFTC’s Boychucker captures the short-lived fad of mid-90s youths with custom, RFTC cutout Pogs. Remember Pogs? Nah, neither do we. The back cover comically spotlights Speedo (Swami) furiously destroying a couple of grade school infants at this forgotten and aggressive activity. Get the original, but checkout this reissue. LONG LIVE POGS!

Smoky Trash

Smoky_TrashBack when Lagwagon’s sophomore album, 1994’s Trashed was rereleased on colored vinyl (2008), buyers were not told which colored vinyl version they would receive. Fat Wreck Chords didn’t indicate the varying array of colors, so nobody knew how many variations of the 765 reissues there were. Then pictures started popping up on forums showcasing a coke bottle clear vinyl version. Having already owned the original, black vinyl version of Trashed, and having received a blue vinyl reissue, I decided it made plenty of sense to order another and try my luck at the coveted coke bottle clear version. What I received was this muddy purple version, and then all 765 were sold out. For the past 7 years I’ve been hunting for that damn coke bottle clear version, but those lucky bastards aren’t selling, and rightfully so. The last one sold on Discogs on 11/13 for a whopping $85, so the hunt for a reasonably priced copy continues. On a side note, I’ve since acquired yet another copy of Trashed with 2011’s Putting Music in its Place box set. It’s a great album, but I may be obsessing just a bit…

Brooklyn Dust Music

DustMajestic and righteous, all in one cohesive and awe-inspiring logo. File under Album Ass, or best logo of all time. On a side note, mainly because I don’t yet own it on vinyl, but how much does “fresh meat” in Underworld’s stellar Mmm, Skyscraper, I Love You sound like “Presley” during the line, “Elvis, fresh meat, a little whip cream?” Intentional? I’d say, yeah! Happy Monday.

Drunk in Public

DrublicArguably the soundtrack to my 1994 summer, NOFX’s fifth studio album Punk in Drublic saw a slight cover variation between the compact disc and the vinyl release. For unknown reasons, the CD had a pink sky behind the floating rodeo queens and the pervie kid below, while the vinyl version (as you can plainly see here) has a light brown sky.

InsertServing (more or less) as the band’s greatest hits album (though, as previously stated, is a proper studio album), Punk in Drublic features the following personal favs: Scavenger Type, Lori Meyers, The Brews, Linoleum, Don’t Call Me White, and Punk Guy. A dubbed cassette version of this album (the B-side being Pennywise’s 1995 classic, About Time) lived inside my truck for a solid three years, and was constantly turned down (or off) by frequent riders as being “not universally enjoyable.” Oh, what I wouldn’t give to experience this album fresh for the first time again.