Inserting

I didn’t realize until recently (he humbly admitted) that the original pressing of BS 2000’s vinyl-only debut was pressed on black wax. I’d heard rumors and praises about a Beastie Boys side project with the numbers “2000” in the title, and when Grand Royal released pink vinyl versions of the debut, I (stupidly) thought it to be the original. As it turns out, the black vinyl (and original) pressing was released in 1997, and the pink reissue followed two years later. It took until last week for me to 1) understand that I did not have the original of this album and 2) acquire the original of this album. This is now the third time I’ve purchased this album. BS 2000, you’re welcome.

I Think it’s Booty, That’s What it Is

An interesting 12″ promo in this 1992 double-sided, same-track Beastie Boys release of the “non-single” Professor Booty. Obtained more as a completed checklist box than anything else, my Check Your Head singles collection is now at 100%. Why The Skills to Pay the Bills wasn’t on Check Your Head, or why it didn’t receive a proper (or even promo) single release (especially over Professor Booty), will never make sense to me. Anyway, that’s my issue. Don’t worry about me. Carry on.

Frozen Metal Head

This EP has eluded me for long enough. A UK only release, 1992’s Frozen Metal Head features two versions of Jimmy James (the Single Version and the Original Original Version), a remix of the single So What’ Chat Want, and the instrumental, Drinkin’ Wine. Though the pressing info isn’t known, she’s housed within a solid white vinyl casing, and sounds perfect to virgin ears. This EP comes highly recommended.

S, M, and A

Up today is a newly acquired masterwork, a bootleg and unofficial rerelease of the Beastie Boys’ 1989 single, An Exciting Evening at Home with Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego. This UK reissue was released 13 years after her official, and much older brother, and houses a sleeker, more modern cover. All the lovable classics are present in this newly packaged version, which include, but are not limited to Your Sister’s Def, Caught in the Middle of a 3-Way Mix, and the sleeper, Some Dumb Cop Gave Me Two Tickets Already, in addition to the title track, Shadrach. The last one, of course, from the album Paul’s Boutique, the sophomore effort from the Beastie Boys. I was going to delve into a difficult-to-abandon-or-ignore story starring me, this bootleg album, and a know-it-all-wanna-be record-store-clerk from Madison, WI… but I’ll save that for a time when I feel like throwing fuel onto the anger fire. Today, let’s enjoy this 6-track gem, and wonder aloud, “what the hell happened to the last 28 years?”

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CHECK YOUR HEAD!

Check Your Head was released 25 years ago today. Crazy. Below is a copy and paste from the newsletter email from earlier today. Had to order the Brooklyn Dust Music hoodie. Had to.

Today is the 25th anniversary of the release of “Check Your Head”! To celebrate the iconic release we’ve got some classic apparel from that era. Check out the new tees and hoodie available and order yours in bundles with the Remastered Double-LP version of Check Your Head. We also also have a few copies of the Limited Collectors Edition Hardcover 4xLP but once those are gone, they’re gone! You don’t want to miss out on this 8-panel gatefold package with foil cover inlay, packaged in a fabric-wrapped, black foil-stamped hardcover “coffee table book” case. Both the Double-LP and 4xLP are pressed on 180-gram vinyl.

As an added bonus, the first 500 orders will get a free Beastie Boys Classic Logo Enamel Pin (US addresses only).

Check it all out at the Official Beastie Boys Online Store today!

Please contact support@kingsroadmerch.com with any questions you may have.

Cheers,
Beastie Boys
Kings Road Merch
support@kingsroadmerch.com

Nasty

Upon its 1998 release, I grew to hold some nasty resentment towards my (then) favorite band’s Hello Nasty release (their fifth). For me, 1992’s Check Your Head and 1994’s Ill Communication were the perfect, bratty blend of aggressive punk and conscious hip hop that defined an era (my high school years). That era ended in 1998 with Nasty. She was released in the summer, and by the fall I’d already moved on to the likes of Crass and Anal Cunt (thank you Ear Wax Records in Madison, WI). I’d kept up with the boys Beastie through the end of their career (2011’s Hot Sauce Committee Part Two), but they’d certainly fallen from the pedestal I’d made for them. Now listening to the 4x LP box set from 2009, and I must admit that my stupid, younger self may have been a bit too harsh on Hello Nasty. It’s certainly one of my least favorite of their albums, but it certainly makes for an enjoyable spin.

For Whom the Cowbell Tolls

I’ve stopped spinning and decided to read about spinning these past few weeks. Couldn’t tell you the last record I spun, to be completely honest. Just finding out of this 2014 book’s existence the other day, she arrived at my stoop late last night. 36 pages in and I’m already blocking several hours to continue over the weekend. If you’re read Dan LeRoy’s 33 1/3 book on Paul’s Boutique, this is part 2 titled, For Whom the Cowbell Tolls – 25 Years of Paul’s Boutique. Along with several circa: 1988 production photos, this book touches upon two more books in the making. One, a complete and official history of Delicious Vinyl by coauthor Peter Relic, and the other an authorized autobiography by the remaining Beastie Boys. Both of which will be sought out and thoroughly analyzed. If you’re a fan of Paul’s Boutique, and you haven’t already, check out the 33 1/3 book. If you’ve read that and love it, For Whom the Cowbell Tolls is a must-read sequel.

The best in men’s clothing
Call Paul’s Boutique, ask for Janice
The number is 718-498-1043
That’s Paul’s Boutique and they’re in Brooklyn

Simply BS

bs_2Time for the ol’ car CD swap out. This happens every three or so months and, let me tell you, going from a 160gb iPod to a single-disc stereo take a bit of getting used to. Presented here is 1997’s vinyl-only self-titled BS 2000 (custom made… only two in existence) and the follow-up, 2000’s Simply Mortified. These were the only “studio” releases by the Beastie Boys side project BS 2000, and we’re about to rediscover them for about the fifth time.

Gimme that Burzootie, Baby

burzootieWell, it’s Tuesday, and it has felt like a Friday for the past three weeks. So, among other things much less noteworthy, let’s, at least for a moment, give an awkward nod to MCA & Burzootie (Adam Yauch and Jay Burnett) on their 1985 12″ Drum Machine. Once a sought after trophy in the Beastie Boys display case, and understandably, this borderline schizophrenic three track 12″ is post-post-hardcore, pre-License to Ill MCA, and is more than demanding of this, or any Tuesday night’s delicious spins. Spin with caution, and spin often.

Know Your Chicken

chickenSilk screened back cover to Money Mark’s debut 10″ Performing Chicken is a little lost piece of Beastie Boys (related) history that I recently discovered among my mountain of 10″ records this overcast Tuesday morning. From 1994 on Love Kit Records / Fido Speaks Music, Performing Chicken is classic, groovy downbeat with a bit of modern Latin flair. This mini-album is just the perfect tone and length for summer afternoon strolls to the hardware store for nubbins, or a quick trip to Kwik Trip for bagged milk. I’ve not heard anything that Mark Ramos-Nishita has touched that I haven’t fallen in love with, and I encourage you to give it a spin on your next trip to Jewish deli for turkey pastrami.

Three Decades of Hype

Revere1986 was a very fruitful year for the Beastie Boys. Nearly every track from their debut LP saw a 12″ or 7″ release (It’s the New Style b/w Paul Revere featured here), and the band, with a lot of help from producer Rick Rubin, sold a very sizable amount of records. This hype sticker, and the music it promotes, is now 30 years old. Crazytown. RIP MCA.

License to Chill

IllThis recent tape obsession seems not to be going away, especially since a fully functional Walkman entered the home. At the very least, cassettes offer an interesting perspective on album art, if and when done well, like with 1986’s License to Ill. Check Your Head uses the same landscape layout, as I’m sure several other legendary albums I’ve yet to acquire also incorporate. Heavy static and bass-y hum offer a nostalgic glimpse into the media of yesteryear, and we’re slowly grabbing up the essentials.

Check Your (Tape) Head

TapesAnother recent obsession in analog media, and the consolidated cassette collection is fully functional. You see, there was a time, not too long ago, where I’d (stupidly) given away 90% of my cassette tapes. I’d already owned them on CD / vinyl / both, or some type bollocks, but now, I’m kicking myself for not holding onto these rectangular treasures. As you can see, the essentials remained in my custody, and today… FINALLY, I’m able to enjoy them again.

Record player (x3), check! Compact disc player, check! 8-track player, (really?) check! Cassette player… well, it’s about damn time!