Only the Greatest

It’s a Greatest Hits kind of day over here at The Groove. The 8-track player is fired up and ready to churn some of the best technology 1974 had to offer. Janis, Jim, and Waylon are on display to offer up their Greatest Hits in pure, 8-track glory. The 8-track collection is rapidly growing… more to come on that in the coming days.

Much, Too Much

Before Jesus Built My Hotrod, before the Revolting Cocks were even a drunken mistake of an idea, before Thieves, Stigmata, and Dark Side of the Spoon, there was Special Affect. This 1980 one-off by Ministry’s Al Jourgensen (guitar) and My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult’s Frank Nardiello aka Groovie Mann (vocals) is up-beat dark wave music for the curious at heart, and you wolves among the sheepish weeds. Brush up on the lyrics to the left then enjoy a rare video of the album’s title track, Too Much Soft Living.


Tools of the Trade

Unexpected needs call for unexpected tools. Case in point, the wife’s spatula to furiously remove disc one of Demon Days from the platter. There were definitely a few minutes there where the nervousness set in, but I was able to keep my cool. Surgery was a success, and the patient is doing well. The Dr. Seuss pencil (normal size) is the perfect center hole size, for those with similar issues. Cue the “The More You Know” jingle.

Your Limo is Ready…

For just $2, back in 1977, you could have delivered, directly to your door, a special, 2 LP comp from some forward-thinkering heads of the Warners sample program. Van Morrison, Fleetwood Mac, Alice Cooper, and even The Doobie Brothers are all present and accounted for… and some Rod Stewart if that’s your thing… it’s certainly not mine. The sampler is simply called Limo, and currently fetches for… you guessed it, $2 over at Discogs. Head on over and check it out.

Mad at the Roxy, Ok!

Looking forward to some Santa Barbara mischief this evening at the Roxy. I haven’t seen the Mad Caddies since around 1999 (my God, has it been that long?!), so tonight should prove to be a profound and nostalgic experience. But who knows? They’re getting old too and may just phone it in. Likely not, but a fun notion to ponder. If you look down and find yourself standing in the Los Angeles area this evening, head on over to The Roxy. Tix are still avail. Cheers.

Liquid Deity

I can venture to say that I’ve never listened to this record, or at the very least, it has been so long since I spun it, I’d forgotten that I owned it. Liquid Jesus’ Pour in the Sky from 1991 on MCA Records. These are the facts, but this obscure band’s details are lost (or hidden) on the interwebs. They don’t have a Wiki page, and Discogs casually lists them as indie rock… a catch-all for just about anything released between 1977 and yesterday afternoon. The cover reminds me of early R.E.M., but we’ll see how she spins. Sometimes, you don’t even need to leave the house to discover new records.


A few things I didn’t notice about Art Garfunkel’s 1975 Columbia records release, Breakaway. 1) Richard Perry produced it (Mr. Perry is famous for his work with Harry Nilsson), and 2) the track My Little Town has Paul Simon on it, making it a legitimate Simon & Garfunkel song. Their last? Of that I’m not sure, but it’s a good day to find out. Thank you, 42 year old hype sticker!

(The Boo-Ga-Loo)

I’m finding it more and more common when ordering albums online that certain, well-to-do sellers package the purchased item between empty, dilapidated record sleeves. Such is the case with this hollow cover of James Brown’s 1966 offering, Plays New Breed (The Boo-Ga-Loo). Not a huge James Brown fan, by any stretch, but I’m now finding myself interested in The Boo-Ga-Loo.


I didn’t realize until recently (he humbly admitted) that the original pressing of BS 2000’s vinyl-only debut was pressed on black wax. I’d heard rumors and praises about a Beastie Boys side project with the numbers “2000” in the title, and when Grand Royal released pink vinyl versions of the debut, I (stupidly) thought it to be the original. As it turns out, the black vinyl (and original) pressing was released in 1997, and the pink reissue followed two years later. It took until last week for me to 1) understand that I did not have the original of this album and 2) acquire the original of this album. This is now the third time I’ve purchased this album. BS 2000, you’re welcome.

Post No. 1600: Back to Camp

For (what seemed like) an eternity, Rocket from the Crypt’s 2002 album, Live from Camp X-Ray (their 7th studio offering) was the last, resonating voice any of us heard from the world’s best live band (2003’s 2-track On the Prowl was nowhere to be found, at least as far as rural Wisconsin was concerned). As a ranking place in their catalog, it sits near the bottom (1998’s RFTC bringing up the rear), but it stood out, if only for the obvious reason, that it was the last-new Rocket thing heard. Since their hiatus, the band has released a handful of (mainly single-sided) 7″ records, in addition to a live recording of their “last” show from Halloween, 2005 and another All Systems Go compilation (their third), but Live from Camp X-Ray (not a live album) still stands as the band’s last studio album. Anyway, Vagrant Records still has copies of their 20 Years series up on their site. Nab these color variants while you can. This album, with all its faults, is still a classic.