See Elsewhere for Details

I broke down and got the newly released Ok Computer OKNOTOK triple blue vinyl reissue. As the hype sticker details about OKNOTOK 1997 2017 (still a bit unsure on the proper title), “LIMITED EDITION BLUE VINYL Triple 180g LP containing the original album, three unreleased tracks and eight B-sides, all newly remastered from original analogue tapes. Includes a download code”. So, there you have it. If a triple blue vinyl release of Radiohead’s most sought after album isn’t worth your $40, I’m not sure what would be.

Old at Newbury

The only other album that I’ve ever heard to legitimately rival The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society (1968, The Kinks) is, of course, Odessey and Oracle by The Zombies (1968). Newbury Comics did an exclusive run back in 2015 of 1000 on… let me look it up because, you know, accuracy… “Red, Blue & Yellow Haze” vinyl. It’s no longer available on Newbury’s site (though I highly recommend their limited run exclusives), but as with most anything, it can be found over at Discogs. If you’ve got the green for some red, blue and yellow, we suggest this amazing and limited reissue.

Prudent Folly

I was beside myself with excitement back in 2015 for this Record Store Day release of Rainbow Ffolly’s 1968 debut, Sallies Fforth… that was until I realized that it skipped on all three of my turntables. Brand new, extracted from beneath the cellophane coffin myself, and she skips… multiple times. This led me to believe, or at least consider, that it may be time to up the quality of my “everyday” turntable. So, once the fog of damage that is my car repair bill finally settles, it’ll be turntable hunting time. I guess it would be cheaper just to buy another copy of this classic psychedelic album, but I’m not one for taking chances.

Liquid Deity

I can venture to say that I’ve never listened to this record, or at the very least, it has been so long since I spun it, I’d forgotten that I owned it. Liquid Jesus’ Pour in the Sky from 1991 on MCA Records. These are the facts, but this obscure band’s details are lost (or hidden) on the interwebs. They don’t have a Wiki page, and Discogs casually lists them as indie rock… a catch-all for just about anything released between 1977 and yesterday afternoon. The cover reminds me of early R.E.M., but we’ll see how she spins. Sometimes, you don’t even need to leave the house to discover new records.

Post No. 1600: Back to Camp

For (what seemed like) an eternity, Rocket from the Crypt’s 2002 album, Live from Camp X-Ray (their 7th studio offering) was the last, resonating voice any of us heard from the world’s best live band (2003’s 2-track On the Prowl was nowhere to be found, at least as far as rural Wisconsin was concerned). As a ranking place in their catalog, it sits near the bottom (1998’s RFTC bringing up the rear), but it stood out, if only for the obvious reason, that it was the last-new Rocket thing heard. Since their hiatus, the band has released a handful of (mainly single-sided) 7″ records, in addition to a live recording of their “last” show from Halloween, 2005 and another All Systems Go compilation (their third), but Live from Camp X-Ray (not a live album) still stands as the band’s last studio album. Anyway, Vagrant Records still has copies of their 20 Years series up on their site. Nab these color variants while you can. This album, with all its faults, is still a classic.

Swagger

Los Angeles-based Celtic punks Flogging Molly entered the entertainment bubble with their debut studio album Swagger back in 2000. The album would be critically acclaimed for their folk / punk / oi mix, and would represent a prolific start to a 17+ year career, up to and including 2017’s Life is Good. Late nights are prime hours to spin Flogging Molly, be it Swagger or otherwise. Just make sure you have enough whiskey on hand.

Out of Africa

I’ve attempted this post from many different angles over the past few days, and I’m conceding. Tricops! provides a very difficult sound to define. Why the need to define is a topic in and of itself, something we’ll reserve for another time. All I can say about Out of Africa, the band’s debut album on Alternative Tentacles Records, is that it’s genre-mashing in the best sense of the term. If you enjoy high-speed journeys through aggressively dangerous terrain, and can stomach the 6+ minute tracks, strap on your bike helmet and check out Out of Africa. It’s an expedition best enjoyed cautiously.

The Arrival

They’ve arrived! And in record time (no pun intended). These records aren’t going to spin themselves, people! Here’s to a triple Group Sounds and double Live from Camp X-Ray type of day!

Side note: I’ve reached out to Vagrant Records to see if there are any plans to release vinyl versions of Rocket’s R.I.P. and All Systems Go! III. We’ll see how it plays out.

Camping

So, it appears that Vagrant Records is doing a 20th anniversary vinyl rerelease series, and its two Rocket from the Crypt records are showcased. Both 2001’s Group Sounds (one of their best), and 2002’s Live from Camp X-Ray (not a live album, and neither 20 years old) are featured. The record to the left isn’t part of that series (I only just ordered the lot this morning), but instead was sold at both the band’s 2013 European reunion tour, and on 2013’s North American Record Store Day. Here is the Vagrant link if you fancy a look.

 

 

Is it Red?

1991’s Ribbed by (then) Los Angeles clowns NOFX received the red vinyl reissue treatment back in 2010. Crazy to think that was 7 years ago, already. Every few years Epitaph Records reissues small color variant batches of its classic albums, so it was only a matter of time before we saw another Ribbed variant. Also released in 2010 is a blue vinyl version, and the crème de la crème dropped in 2014 (clear vinyl). Still on the lookout for that one.

Red With Ivy

One of our four (4) Energy records, this red vinyl reissue was released back in April of 2012 (along with the clear vinyl version previously touched upon) and is limited to only 500 pressings. I remember ordering the red vinyl version from Epitaph Records (along with the red vinyl version of the 12″ Hectic), then later finding out that there was a Hot Topic clear vinyl version out in the wild. Took me some time to track that puppy down, but red came first. You can’t have enough Energy, am I right?!

30-love

I’ll admit, I was pleasantly surprised by the wistful exuberance quietly erupting from Tennis’ fourth studio album, 2017’s Yours Conditionally. She was a polite dinner guest the other night while I enjoyed a lovely tuna quinoa dish with Mrs. Prudent Groove. Yours Conditionally was a Vinyl Me, Please release, Vol. 51 to be exact, and is housed in a VMP variant cover with exclusive pink and blue colored vinyl. She was released back in early March, but we’d only just gotten around to spinning it. Tennis… welcome to the collection.

ATDI Returns

There’s been a lot of water under the bridge since the last At the Drive-In release. 17 years of water to be exact. So needless to say, I’m a little curious to hear what 2017 ATDI brings. I was living in Milwaukee at the time Relationship of Command dropped (their last), and I’m in Los Angeles now, so I can only imagine the mountain of change that this mammoth band endured over the past 17 years. Fingers crossed.

Frozen Metal Head

This EP has eluded me for long enough. A UK only release, 1992’s Frozen Metal Head features two versions of Jimmy James (the Single Version and the Original Original Version), a remix of the single So What’ Chat Want, and the instrumental, Drinkin’ Wine. Though the pressing info isn’t known, she’s housed within a solid white vinyl casing, and sounds perfect to virgin ears. This EP comes highly recommended.

Clearly Oldschool

operationIt can’t be stated enough, but for me, an album reaches pinnacle status once pressed on clear vinyl. My entire collection would be clear vinyl if at all possible, so when Hellcat Records released Operation Ivy’s only full-length on clear wax, I knew it was time to retire this monumental release. Already owning it on black, red, and picture disc, clear is the perfect shade to round out not only a perfect album, but a formidable chapter in my ears’ career.

Phobos

orangeI’ve been waiting for 8 months to showcase an amazing analysis of Monolith of Phobos, the spectacular debut release from The Claypool Lennon Delirium (Les Claypool and Sean Lennon… no joke), and this post is (clearly) not said analysis. I’ll have to circle back when 1) I have more time and 2) well, there is no 2). If you haven’t already, and I’m sure you have, CHECK. OUT. THE. CLAYPOOL. LENNON. DELIRIUM.