The Two

I’ve been going back and forth between these two albums over the past few days. They couldn’t be any more different in style, but they both hold important positions in my personal history. One one hand, you’ve got White Trash, Two Heebs and a Bean (not the original title… this is the PG version) which takes me back to my high school years, and The Best of the Statler Brothers, which takes me back even further to my adolescent years. “Going back” is the theme, I suppose, and both are adequate vehicles by which to travel. It’s good to have options, I suppose.

Process 70’s France

Hop an intercontinental flight with Bob & Susan and journey through the provocative streets of Paris on this Process 70 Series 2000 easy listening day-trip from Gorden Jenkins and His Orchestra. Simply titled France, this Time Records stereo release is courageous in its approach to bringing the listener “in” to the French experience. Complete with between-song sound effects and comical dialogue (circa: 1962), you, the listener, can piggyback through the wondrous sounds (no sights, kids… this is a record, remember) of an actual French vacation… given that the vacation isn’t yours and you’re subject to the predestined locations that strategically complement the next song to spill from your living room speakers (or kitchen, I don’t know where you keep your stereo set-up… no judgements here). Check it out. It’s certainly not an everyday listen, but it’s a hell of a lot of fun.

Have a Laugh

Go ahead. Have a laugh. It’s Friday! Enjoy some Richard Pryor, some Steve Martin, some Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, or even some Marx Brothers (featured here). In fact, listen to whatever makes you laugh out loud, be it the latest Kid Rock album, or maybe some goofy They Might Be Giants (The Prudent Groove does not actually suggest you listen to Kid Rock). Happy Friday, and don’t forget to laugh!

Sonic Workshop

Motion in Percussion, people! Get into the super-sonic-spaced-out-stereophonic sound with The Hollywood ‘Pops’ Symphony and their 1958 (or 1959) release, Motion in Percussion and Orchestra. Sonic Workshop (the label) does an “astounding” job of selling the visual experience with their stereophonic albums (of which there are only a handful). For all its scientific advances and groundbreaking recording techniques, it simply comes down to one fact: how damn good is the music? Motion in Percussion and Orchestra in no way disappoints, and is perfect party-pop fodder for even the casual SAP (Space Age Pop) listener. Highly recommended.

See Elsewhere for Details

I broke down and got the newly released Ok Computer OKNOTOK triple blue vinyl reissue. As the hype sticker details about OKNOTOK 1997 2017 (still a bit unsure on the proper title), “LIMITED EDITION BLUE VINYL Triple 180g LP containing the original album, three unreleased tracks and eight B-sides, all newly remastered from original analogue tapes. Includes a download code”. So, there you have it. If a triple blue vinyl release of Radiohead’s most sought after album isn’t worth your $40, I’m not sure what would be.

Compact Flood

Rummaging through my old high school CDs is both a chore and a mini adventure. Several years ago I’d gotten rid of 90% of my (near 1000) compact discs and paralleled my record collecting with digital hording. So after copying the CDs, out they went… save for a select few (100 or so… ok, maybe 200). Flood was my first introduction to the mighty Giants, and is as good now as it was back in 1994, which I imagine was as good as it was in 1990 upon its initial release. I’m not really going anywhere with this save to say that this album will spin in some form today… be it record, compact disc, or by 160gb hard disc.

Esque

Part insert, part cover (thanks to the die-cut heavy duty outer shell), this glossy sleeve to Esquivel and His Orchestra’s 1962 classic, and Space Age Pop essential, Latin-Esque give an in-depth look into the technical advances in the recording of this album. It’s an interesting read, and remember kids, this is 1962.
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As she goes, “This album represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first time in the history of stereo recording in which absolute separation of channels has been achieved.” Click on the photo to continue reading.

Old at Newbury

The only other album that I’ve ever heard to legitimately rival The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society (1968, The Kinks) is, of course, Odessey and Oracle by The Zombies (1968). Newbury Comics did an exclusive run back in 2015 of 1000 on… let me look it up because, you know, accuracy… “Red, Blue & Yellow Haze” vinyl. It’s no longer available on Newbury’s site (though I highly recommend their limited run exclusives), but as with most anything, it can be found over at Discogs. If you’ve got the green for some red, blue and yellow, we suggest this amazing and limited reissue.

Prudent Folly

I was beside myself with excitement back in 2015 for this Record Store Day release of Rainbow Ffolly’s 1968 debut, Sallies Fforth… that was until I realized that it skipped on all three of my turntables. Brand new, extracted from beneath the cellophane coffin myself, and she skips… multiple times. This led me to believe, or at least consider, that it may be time to up the quality of my “everyday” turntable. So, once the fog of damage that is my car repair bill finally settles, it’ll be turntable hunting time. I guess it would be cheaper just to buy another copy of this classic psychedelic album, but I’m not one for taking chances.

All that Glitters…

In 1972, Fantasy Records released an 8-track comp album of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s most beloved radio classics titled, Creedence Gold. Born on the Bayou, The Midnight Special, Bad Moon Rising, I Heard it Through the Grapevine, Proud Mary, etc. The die-cut cover offers band member profiles in an interesting “gotcha” marketing ploy. It worked on me, and for close to $2, it should work on you as well! Keep an eye out for Gold. It’s out there.