The Daredevil of Jazz

Super excited about our latest acquisition, the sure-to-be classic, Jazz Daredevil by none other than (H.) Jon Benjamin. I knew nothing about this release until about a week ago (he wrote shamefully), but having been a fan of Mr. Benjamin since my high school days (Dr. Katz,  Professional Therapist), I scoured the internet searching (successfully) for a reasonably priced copy. Not paying the $225 some dude on Discogs is asking. You, sir, are crazy! Anyway, we’ll spin her tonight (or tomorrow), depending on the breaks. If you’re unfamiliar with this “concept” album, have a peek at the trailer. Yes, there’s a trailer, and yes, it’s as every bit of amazing that you think it is.

Needle Needs

Well, the much-expected and heavily-dreaded day has come, and after 14 years of ownership, the 1966 Philco cabinet hi-fi all-transistor stereophonic radio-phonograph is in need of a replacement needle. Sigh. Although miffed and a bit curious (as to how it broke), I’m confident that a replacement can, and will be found. Now begins a hunt of a completely different kind.

Deltron + Beer & Food

Wait, so Dogfish Head Brewery teamed up with Deltron 3030 and released a 4-track 10″ on white vinyl?! What’s more, the cover is littered with Deltron 3030-inspired recipes for you and your friends to enjoy over a cool, craft Dogfish Head beer. Check it out, but only on an empty stomach. (Recipes include: Momofuku Fried Chicken, Frittelle di Zucchini and Ricotta, Grilled Oysters with Charred Onions in Brown Butter and Pink Peppercorns, Civet de Homard au Cidre, and Positive Contact Trifle, among others.) Enjoy.

Two Volumes are Better Than One

So happy to FINALLY complete the much anticipated, critically acclaimed Provocative Percussion series by Mr. Enoch Light and the Light Brigade. Hernando’s Hideaway is an early standout, followed by Foggy Day Cha Cha and What is This Thing Called Love. Completing a set is so gratifying, though I’m a bit sad that my journey is over. Oh, well. Now, it’s time to listen.

(A)Live Album

Live Album (aka the Grand Funk Railroad live album) was released by Capitol Records in the summer of 1970. Though the gatefold cover shows the band performing at the Atlanta International Pop Festival (fourth of July weekend), none of Live Album’s tracks were recorded there. A little food for misguided thought. Also present at the festival were It’s a Beautiful Day, Procol Harum, B.B. King, The Allman Brothers Band, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Spirit, and Mott the Hoople. Sounds like a dangerous time. It’s no wonder none of the band’s songs from this performance were included on the record.

Back to the Top

It’s a Degüello kind of day ’round these here parts. Actually, it’s BEEN a Degüello kind of day for some time coming. It should be on Spotify if you don’t have it (which you should), so be sure to check it out at some point today. Originally slated for today’s post was 1983’s Eliminator… that was until I found some unidentified gunk on the cover. Far be it for me to air my dirty vinyl laundry.

Colors of the Sun

I’m excited to start my collection of reissue debut classics from the seminal four from Sun Records. First acquired is Roy Orbison’s At the Rock House (originally released in 1961). Somewhere in transit is Jerry Lee Lewis’ 1958 debut of the same name, and down the pike will be Dance Album of Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash’s With His Hot and Blue Guitar. As you can plainly see, Roy’s reissue is on rockin’ red vinyl, where Mr. Lewis’ is on sleek silver. Carl’s is on blue suede, and Cash’s on fire orange. A great (and cheap) way to acquire these rock n’ roll classics.

The BBQ Lives!

Found out about this one a bit late, but we were still able to catch the majority of Mike Watt and Secondmen at Liquid Kitty Punk Rock BBQ’s new location in Cypress, Cafe Nela. A random appearance by Keith Morris (and what looked to be his family) was a treat. Bummed we missed Lawndale. RIP Liquid Kitty.

Drunk in Public

So, this hoppened (see what I did there?). Fat Mike of famed NOFX teamed up with (and apparently caused disruption for) the Stone Brewing company. Labeled as a “hoppy lager,” Punk in Drublic was (very) recently released in the Southern California area to promote a punk all-start / craft brew tour of the same name (Punk in Drublic… NOFX’s fifth studio album released back in 1994). If you can find it, GET IT! Not so much for the taste, but for the pure awesomeness that is this reality. Cheers.

Fantastic Savings

When your savings are fantastic, Pat Boone is present. He may be on the radio, hiding behind an old oak tree, or he may be haunting your dreams… again. For a cool $0.87, you don’t care about sleepless nights and shivering cold sweats, because with fantastic savings, comes Pat Boone.

(Friendly inflation calculator info: $0.87 in 1962 is $7.05 today. Cue the jingle.)

Virus

I want to devise a virus
To bring dire straits to your environment
Crush your corporations with a mild touch
Trash your whole computer system and revert you to papyrus

So begins Virus, the 2000 doomsday “single” off Deltron 3030’s debut album, Deltron 3030. Positive Contact, the 2001 single off the same debut, would have been my first choice for single-hood, but the Deltron team had a different plan. Back with Things You Can Do, this 6-track single contains the album versions, the stupid radio edits, and the chill instrumentals. Remember kids, Deltron 3030 released both of their studio albums as instrumentals, so consider that the next time you and your lover lock lustful eyes.

The Surplus

Though I’m not blown away by the first spin of Surplus 1980’s 2013 mini album Arterial End Here, I will say that I’m willing to put in the overtime to properly ingest its contents. Maybe I was having a bad day, or maybe this collection of 7 songs seem half-baked, but there’s something unsettling about how unsettling this (mini) album is. Give it time… my new mantra.

Yellow Bird

Originally titled Percussion Spectacular!, Arthur Lyman’s 1961 “haunting melody” track, Yellow Bird, became a major hit, and Percussion Spectacular! would bow to its rereleased name, Yellow Bird. Whatever the hell you call it, L-1004 (catalog tag release name from HiFi Records) is another classic space age pop release by the master of ethereal delight, Mr. Arthur Lyman, and should be strongly considered for your next social gathering.

RIP 78rpm

This 1956 reissue of Duke Ellington’s 1951 classic, Masterpieces, was one of the first records to take full advantage of the (then) new long play (LP) format. Previously restricted to about three and a half minutes on 78rpm records, Mr. Ellington and his partners in crime liberated listeners with Mood Indigo, the 15-minute opener of jaw-dropping proportions. Though I much prefer the cover art to this reissue, the 1951 original is something of recorded music history, and therefore one I shall hunt down. But seriously, this album is amazing in any format, and as with any Ellington release, comes highly recommended by the feeble minds here at The Prudent Groove.

Olé ELO

I’m a sucker for album covers that feature, well, album covers, so ELO’s 1976 compilation Olé ELO was a no-brainer. Strange Magic, Evil Woman, Roll Over Beethoven, Ma-Ma-Ma Belle… this single disc release has just about everything a novice ELO fan could want (save maybe for Rockaria! or Livin’ Thing, which would come out this same year on the band’s sixth studio album, A New World Record). Anyway, you can find this record for dirt cheap. Do yourself a favor and move it to the top of your list.