Nasty

Upon its 1998 release, I grew to hold some nasty resentment towards my (then) favorite band’s Hello Nasty release (their fifth). For me, 1992’s Check Your Head and 1994’s Ill Communication were the perfect, bratty blend of aggressive punk and conscious hip hop that defined an era (my high school years). That era ended in 1998 with Nasty. She was released in the summer, and by the fall I’d already moved on to the likes of Crass and Anal Cunt (thank you Ear Wax Records in Madison, WI). I’d kept up with the boys Beastie through the end of their career (2011’s Hot Sauce Committee Part Two), but they’d certainly fallen from the pedestal I’d made for them. Now listening to the 4x LP box set from 2009, and I must admit that my stupid, younger self may have been a bit too harsh on Hello Nasty. It’s certainly one of my least favorite of their albums, but it certainly makes for an enjoyable spin.

Venus Envy

venusenvyFat Wreck Chords’ subsidiary, Honest Don’s Records, was a heavy-spun favorite back in my early college days. Diesel Boy’s Strap on Seven Inch (a 7″, naturally) was my first introduction to the snotty Santa Rosa band, and I’ve been (nostalgically) hooked ever since. Venus Envy is the band’s second studio album, and just arrived on my doorstep. If you know a Don, keep him honest. If you don’t, have your way over here.

Book 1

Book1The secret ingredient inside the 2014 LP boxset by experimental-thrash-geniuses, Fantomas titled, Wunderkammer, contains the all-inclusive Mike Patton demo of the band’s first album… on cassette. She was digitized today, and let me be the first to tell you, it was no easy feat. Interweaving rhythmic bursts make for a significantly difficult editing session, but we were able to hammer out something of adequate sustenance. The results were well, well worth the frustration.

Break it Up

BreakItUpThis 1998 UK release on Elemental Records by the sultans of sleaze, San Diego surfers Rocket from the Crypt, is the latest checked mark on the slowly shrinking list of remaining Rocket records. This journey to acquire their discography will likely take me another decade to achieve, but the full result will have been well worth the wait… or so I’m telling myself each and every day I search for my missing, spinnable links.

Open 24 Hours

24This Telegraph, Skolars split is something of legend in my personal circle (of two). Ever since seeing Telegraph opened for Less Than Jake at my buddy’s 18th birthday (way back in 1997), I’ve been a (wherewithal) loyal Telegraph fan. I saw The Skolars here, and then their reincarnation at said 18th bday, LTJ show. I’m ecstatic to own Quit Your Band (97 Demo) and Open 24 Hours on vinyl. It’s a good day when these tracks get spun, and I encourage all quasi-ska-punk lovers to consider both The Skolars and Telegraph to justify your next swing-filled fix.

1998 Feels Like A Lifetime Ago

HelloThe double Grammy winning album sold a whopping 680,000 + units its first week alone, and was undoubtedly that summer’s celebrated soundtrack, both personally and commercially. Abandoning the mix of hardcore and hip hop that 1992’s Check Your Head and 1994’s Ill Communication provided, Hello Nasty was straight-forward hip hop, and featured new DJ, Mix Master Mike (DJ Hurricane, the Beasties’ original DJ left prior to the making of the album).

NastyThis double, clear gold vinyl edition was released by Grand Royal Records (as opposed to the double black vinyl version released by Capitol Records), and was limited to 7500 copies. Hello Nasty was produced by the Beasties and Mario C (Mario Caldato, Jr), and is certified triple Platinum (3,000,000 copies sold) in the United States alone (roughly 3,600,000 worldwide).