My Man Floyd

I own a total of one Floyd Cramer record, and this is it. 1966’s Only the Big Ones (RCA Victor), contains some pretty heavy-hitters: The Summer Wind, You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away, Yesterday, What’s New Pussycat?, and a personal favorite, Hang on Sloopy. Only the Big Ones is a bit more groovy to be considered elevator music, but like “yesterday’s” addition, is a very good representation of uplifting, happy-time instrumental piano-jazz music.

60-Year-Old Slogan

If your standard, run-of-the-mill record sleeve is referred to as a jacket, think of this simply designed, 60-year-old, thin sheath as an undershirt for your coveted records. RCA Victor Records manufactured this elegant slogan in the late 1950’s (this one found inside Perry Como’s When You Come to the End of Your Day, LSP-1885 from 1958), and although I wasn’t around then to verify the legitimacy of its claim, I dig the somewhat modest approach at presenting this familiar phrase. I tend to side with a company that developed and released the first 33 1/3 record and the first 45 rpm record, so it’s legit in my book.

Listen…

…┬áto these recent RCA Victor releases. This is a command, not a suggestion. Top tier entertainment advertising from 1960, right before your very eyes. Como Swings (LSP-2010, 1959), Chet Atkins’ Teensville (LSP-2161, 1960), and Elvis is Back!, presumably from that hip-swingin’ clam bake (LSP-2231, 1960). These titles and many more are “now available in NEW ORTHOPHONIC and LIVING STEREO versions.” Contact your dealer for more details.

The Music America Loves Best (1951 Version)

By 1951, RCA Victor Records had released enough records to fill a 280 page catalog. This is a fact. From “A” You’re Adorable (47-2899, 1949) by Perry Como to Zigeunerweisen, Op. 20 (LCT-1002, year unknown), RCA’s entire production could be found in clear black and white, and as the catalog itself suggests, “The records in the Request Catalog (not pictured here) your dealer will order for you, gladly and promptly.” So dig in and mosey on down to your brick and mortar for some great RCA Victor releases!

Esque

Part insert, part cover (thanks to the die-cut heavy duty outer shell), this glossy sleeve to Esquivel and His Orchestra’s 1962 classic, and Space Age Pop essential, Latin-Esque give an in-depth look into the technical advances in the recording of this album. It’s an interesting read, and remember kids, this is 1962.
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As she goes, “This album represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first time in the history of stereo recording in which absolute separation of channels has been achieved.” Click on the photo to continue reading.

DAYO

Calypso, Harry Belafonte’s third album, is an exciting and turbulent ride. It precedes Jump Up Calypso, my personal favorite, by about five years, and is pure, unquestionable, Belafonte gold. Both figuratively and literally, having officially reaching Gold status, and it was the first LP in history to sell over one million copies. Don’t believe me? Check the cover. “One of the Biggest-Selling Albums of All Time… Says it all, mate!

$0.92… Folk That!

BelaI was a little apprehensive upon finding Harry Belafonte’s first album in the $1 bin at my local brick & mortar today. I mean, she’s been widely distributed, enjoyed, and redistributed over the past 62 years (1954 -2016), and as a result, she’s a bit beat-the-shit-up. SEVERAL skips marinate the vocal forthcomings of this majestic record, but I still don’t question the trade of my GW. Not only because it’s Mr. Belafonte’s first, but because it’s that damn good.