Electric Eclectics

moogBy far the best late 60s Moog record I’ve ever heard, Dick Hyman’s 1969 insta-classic Moog – The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman offers two parts satisfying melody, equal parts goofball, and a twist of the unexpected. I imagine the Moog to be like the zither for those who aren’t keen on the distinct sound, but for those in the mood (the Moog mood?) for a cheerful listening adventure, The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman are just a needle drop away.

 

Quiet Village

quietWe expanded the Martin Denny collection this weekend, tripled it actually, with the help of his 1959 album, Quiet Village – The Exotic Sounds of Martin Denny. Passed up Volume III of Exotica (stupidly), but managed to secure another 1959 classic of Mr. Denny’s, Afro-Desia. I don’t know what the hell was going on in the late 50s, early 60s, but things are getting out of control in a hurry!

Event 2

event3The possibility of a Dr. Octagon show next month has gotten me 1) a little excited and 2) in the mood for Dan the Automator. Presented here is The Instrumentals version of Deltron 3030’s 2013 sophomore effort, Event 2, but, you know, like I said, the instrumental version of it. Be it Wanna Buy a Monkey?, his work on the video game 2K7, Lovage, or Handsome Boy Modeling School, one can very seldom (read: never) go wrong with a little Dan the Automator.

Volume 3

volume31959-1961 were very busy years for Command Records, and its owner / originator and record producer Enoch Light. Releasing all four volumes of Persuasive Percussion within this time, as well as Volumes 1 – 3 of Provocative Percussion (Volume 4 came out in 1962), the label, and mastermind Mr. Light, damn-near defined the Space Age Pop sound, while offered amazing, minimalist album covers in the process. If you’ve ever wanted to fill your bachelor pad with the persuasive and provocative sounds of Space Age Pop, we strongly recommend either (both) of these collections.

Get Your MOTOR Runnin’

bleepMan, I wish MOTOR would put out some new music. Maybe they have, and I’ve been under my umbrella of Space Age Pop for too long. Unlikely. MOTOR is definitely one of those bands you need to seek out in order to stay above the line of awareness. They’re not social media darlings, and they certainly don’t pop up on KCRW (they’re more likely to pop up on KXLU, though I’ve never heard them there). Anyway, man I wish MOTOR would put out some new music.

That Time Vinyl Me, Please Made Right

pandaSo, quick story. I’m a member of Vinyl Me, Please, and outstanding record-a-month club that you should most certainly check out if you aren’t already a member. Well, last month’s double LP was Panda Bear’s Person Pitch, and instead of getting disc 1 and disc 2, what one would assume, I got 2x disc 1s. It actually took me a song to realize when I put the 2nd record on the platter. Anyway, I took a photo of my bastardized album, send it to Vinyl Me, Please, and in less than a week I received a brand new, fully functional double LP of Person Pitch, this time with correct discs. Vinyl Me, Please made right, and I’d like people to know that.

So the photo. The photo is the art print that came with Panda Bear’s Person Pitch (one comes with every month’s release, as does a pairing cocktail catered to that month’s specific album… it’s pretty damn cool). I’m not sure if there is a name of the print, but it’s original artwork by Mi Ju. Give respect where respect is due, kids.

 

Boingo

boingoWhat I once thought was Oingo Boingo’s first release, 1980’s Oingo Boingo, is actually their third, following 1976’s 7″ You Got Your Baby Back and 1978’s extremely limited 10″ titled Demo EP (only 130 copies released). Regardless of its apparent lack of exclusivity, this 10″ predates their epic 1981 studio debut, Only a Lad, and is the perfect soundtrack for a lazy, salsa-making day.

Enjoy…

crlpA friendly reminder that Columbia Records (now owned by Sony Music Entertainment) would like for you to enjoy the world’s greatest catalog of high-fidelity records… superbly performed and recorded on Columbia 33 1/3 LP Records. Your favorite artists… your favorite music reproduced with matchless clarity and realism.

Enjoy Columbia Records, and have a great Friday doing it.

Break the Blues, not the Bank

breakers1966’s Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, aka The Beano Album, is John Mayall’s first studio album, and his second overall. Featuring a comic-reading, and marginally defiant Eric Clapton, Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton is widely considered John Mayall’s most popular, although not best, output, and is ranked by Rolling Stone magazine at number 195 of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Also, I found it at my local brick and mortar for only $1 (hence the title of this post).

8-Track Stack, Jack

eightThe eventual overflow of media consumption often yields an entirely new media with which to consume. 8-tracks aren’t new around these parts, we’re just finally starting to get serious about them. With any collection, the bar is set, achieved, then moved. This endless cycle continues without rest or hesitation. The current bar is The Kinks are the Village Green Preservation Society, an 8-track only two people in the online community own. Both have refused my offers to purchase this holy grail of magnetic tape sound recording technology, so this dimly lit search trudges on.

Special thanks to my folks for nabbing up $0.25 8-tracks on their many thrift store adventures.