Red With Ivy

One of our four (4) Energy records, this red vinyl reissue was released back in April of 2012 (along with the clear vinyl version previously touched upon) and is limited to only 500 pressings. I remember ordering the red vinyl version from Epitaph Records (along with the red vinyl version of the 12″ Hectic), then later finding out that there was a Hot Topic clear vinyl version out in the wild. Took me some time to track that puppy down, but red came first. You can’t have enough Energy, am I right?!

Plastic Surgery Revisited

Oh, man. I can say, with an honest tongue, that the Dead Kennedys were my favorite band for about six months one year back in the early 2000’s. This copy was purchased at a little book store in Madison, WI (I believe it was Frugal Muse) while on my way back to the pizza shop on a delivery. One takes luxuries now and again, and for only $10 which, at the time was high, but seems like tip money now. I think my move to California and my new found love for James Booker knocked me out of my DK cloud, but their first two albums are still in my top 20 of all time (1980’s Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables and this, 1982’s Plastic Surgery Disasters). Cheers.

30-love

I’ll admit, I was pleasantly surprised by the wistful exuberance quietly erupting from Tennis’ fourth studio album, 2017’s Yours Conditionally. She was a polite dinner guest the other night while I enjoyed a lovely tuna quinoa dish with Mrs. Prudent Groove. Yours Conditionally was a Vinyl Me, Please release, Vol. 51 to be exact, and is housed in a VMP variant cover with exclusive pink and blue colored vinyl. She was released back in early March, but we’d only just gotten around to spinning it. Tennis… welcome to the collection.

Cha Chas for Dancing

Chas Chas for Dancing… as opposed to Cha Chas for Spelunking. From the series that brought you After Hours Middle East by Sonny Lester & His Orchestra, Murder, Inc. by Irving Joseph, and Bossa Nova + Soul by Marian McPartland comes Cha Chas for Dancing by Hugo Montenegro. Series 2000 is an eclectic set, but one worth the hunt and spin. Keep an eye or two out when thrift store digging.

ATDI Returns

There’s been a lot of water under the bridge since the last At the Drive-In release. 17 years of water to be exact. So needless to say, I’m a little curious to hear what 2017 ATDI brings. I was living in Milwaukee at the time Relationship of Command dropped (their last), and I’m in Los Angeles now, so I can only imagine the mountain of change that this mammoth band endured over the past 17 years. Fingers crossed.

Knuckles

Ladies and gentlemen, Knuckles O’Toole is a pseudonym used by Dick Hyman. Didn’t know that until today. Apparently several artists used this pseudonym to release ragtime records from the 50s through the 70s. Mr. Hyman recording only two albums under this alias, and I’m trying to figure out specifically which two O’Toole albums they are. I’m about 60% this is one of them, but what the hell do I know? Ragtime piano isn’t (necessarily) my go-to, but it is a pleasant vacation from time to time.

Frozen Metal Head

This EP has eluded me for long enough. A UK only release, 1992’s Frozen Metal Head features two versions of Jimmy James (the Single Version and the Original Original Version), a remix of the single So What’ Chat Want, and the instrumental, Drinkin’ Wine. Though the pressing info isn’t known, she’s housed within a solid white vinyl casing, and sounds perfect to virgin ears. This EP comes highly recommended.

S, M, and A

Up today is a newly acquired masterwork, a bootleg and unofficial rerelease of the Beastie Boys’ 1989 single, An Exciting Evening at Home with Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego. This UK reissue was released 13 years after her official, and much older brother, and houses a sleeker, more modern cover. All the lovable classics are present in this newly packaged version, which include, but are not limited to Your Sister’s Def, Caught in the Middle of a 3-Way Mix, and the sleeper, Some Dumb Cop Gave Me Two Tickets Already, in addition to the title track, Shadrach. The last one, of course, from the album Paul’s Boutique, the sophomore effort from the Beastie Boys. I was going to delve into a difficult-to-abandon-or-ignore story starring me, this bootleg album, and a know-it-all-wanna-be record-store-clerk from Madison, WI… but I’ll save that for a time when I feel like throwing fuel onto the anger fire. Today, let’s enjoy this 6-track gem, and wonder aloud, “what the hell happened to the last 28 years?”

Have I the Right?

I know I’ve asked this before, but is a multi-skip record worth $1? I’m of the party that wholeheartedly screams “yes” to this question, especially when said $1 record is The Honeycombs’ debut album, Here are The Honeycombs from 1964. Like many things of the time, this US version houses a different cover and different title (UK / original version simply titled, The Honeycombs), though maintains the same track order as the UK original, which is interesting. Moving on, Have I the Right? was the first and highest charting single by the band, a group that would only release two studio albums throughout their lightning career. Although the popular British songwriting duo Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley are credited as having written Have I the Right? (and they did), it was this riveting pop group led by their talented female drummer that forced the selling of over a million copies. If you’ve forgotten the track, have a listen.

Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond

Alcoa (which is short for Aluminum Company of America), backed the ABC show One Step Beyond from 1959 – 1961. These are facts. This, is the soundtrack to that show. Another fact. Acquired simply for the “far-out” cover, (and although she skips like a rock), she’s a great example of “zither music” (the genre, not the actual instrument) for this place and time. Remember, kids, The Twilight Zone was popular during these years, so the idea of supernatural and impossibly imaginative adventures were all the prime time craze. Symphony Orchestra conducted by Harry Lubin… So, there you have it.