Pay the Man

Skyscraper Records released this 5-track EP back in 1992, and I can’t for the life of me remember the circumstances surrounding its acquisition. It’s probably one of the first, say, 100 records I’ve obtained, and aside from maybe a Half Price Books deal, it was probably found on one of my many, many, early hunting days, likely at a Goodwill or a St. Vinnie’s. Come to think of it, I haven’t hunted the thrift stores in close to a lifetime (a few years at least), something certainly worth reconsidering, as is relistening to the transparent blue record found beneath Clown Martin, here.

Hooked on Phonic

Full frequency stereophonic sound, like you’ve never heard it reproduced before. Though there’s certainly something nostalgic and simple about the grandfather mono sound, something cleaner, it goes without saying that the technological advances of stereophonic sound changed the audio recording game for the better. Whatever your preference per individually pressed records, we’re all kings and queens of our own destinies, in large part to stereophonic sound.

8 Book

1977’s Book of Dreams was The Steve Miller Band’s 10th studio album, and arguably their most prolific release. 7 of the tracks would appear on the band’s Greatest Hits 1974 – 1978 album, which appeared just a year after Book hit record store shelves. The classic Jet Airliner is the obvious standout (or Jed & Lina, depending on who you ask), but Book also contains the party-favorite Jungle Love. In all, it’s no question, given the outrageous success, that this album would appear on multiple formats. Presented here is a newly acquired 8-track. Same track order as the vinyl release, save for Swingtown which is broken into two parts. No joke, The Steve Miller band hit it huge with Book of Dreams.

Elvis Model 8

Another find from the recent online hunt is (yet) another Elvis Costello release. This time, This Year’s Model on 8-track. Now, I know we’d “recently” touched upon the vinyl version of this seminal album, but let’s be honest, is $12 too much to pay for an essential, recent obsession on an obsolete format? Well, clearly, the answer is an astounding no! Happy New Year, kids!

Headliners

Yesteryear’s headliners include, but are not limited to, Marty Robbins, Johnny Mathis, The Four Lads, The Dave Brubeck Trio, and Tony Bennett. Limited to “exclusive” member of Columbia (yes… THAT Columbia), circa: 1960, this collection of pop jingles by moguls of yesterday’s legends has its place and time, and is perfect for evenings waiting for your significant other to finish “getting ready.” Love you! 😉

True 8 (Elvis)

So, and I’m sure this comes as no surprise, but when I get into something, say an artist, say, Elvis Costello, I get head over heels into them! This recent acquisition, on 8-track cassette is of Elvis Costello’s debut, 1977 album, My Aim is True. Lucky for us, the 8-track stereo hi-fi is in full, functioning order, so casual reading sessions on the living room couch will now sound even better, thanks to Declan Patrick MacManus and his late 70s classic.

More Monkees

Hey, hey! More of the Monkees, released back in ’67, as you’re well aware, I’m sure, was recently added to the collection by means of my cold-loving (or, at the very least, cold-tolerating) family. As my wife is the self-proclaimed fifth Monkee (more, much, much more for another time), this record annoys the neighbors in ways that make us happy well beyond our years. Riddle me this, Davy… why the shit were (I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone and I’m A Believer saved for this second helping catch-all? A long-lasting question for the ages… and now, Mr. Serling

Gold Mill

Never one to scoff at anything swing-era related, I thank my thoughtful kin for this greatest hits collection by the comfort-inducing Glenn Miller, simply and adequately titled, Pure Gold. Chattanooga Choo Choo, In the Mood, Little Brown Jug… I can go on and on, and on, and on… I will say, for the record, that Moonlight Serenade (also included on this 12″) may, in fact, be one of the best songs ever written. Comfort food for the ears. You’re welcome.

There… A Patriot’s Tale

An American Heritage Record… need I say more? Yes?! Well, fine, then. This unique collection (titled Over Here Over There) consists of popular WWII songs on both sides of the Atlantic (United States and England, for those of you geographically inclined). An interesting concept compilation album, for sure, the household eagerly looks forward to this historical trip down Popmusic Ln.

Ranwood Records, Inc.

Ranwood, as it turns out, was co-owned by bandleader, and grandparent-favorite, Lawrence Welk starting back in 1968. Together with Dot Records creator Randy Wood, Ranwood (see where the name comes from?) would enjoy moderate success up until, and surpassing the acquisition by Mr. Lawrence Welk, whose bulk library was released on the label. Any way you spin it, this logo is one that can’t be beat!

Priceless

Though the year is unknown, I estimate this price sticker to be somewhere in the mid-1960s range. Let’s say, for the sake of this post, that we’re looking at sealed record from 1968, with a price tag of $3.97. Adjusted for inflation, that same sealed record would cost you a whopping $28.67 today. That’s a bit of a jump, no? Anyway, $28 and change is, unfortunately, about the going rate for new releases these days (a bit more for Mondo and Waxwork gems). Which, in a roundabout way, brings me to my point. Buy used records. Hunt down original releases, and save yourself a hefty sum. Unless, of course, you’ve got a bottomless coin purse, then the world is your canvas, assuming of course you have space for all of your fancy colors.

Frankie Goes to Avalon

My (extremely limited) exposure to Frankie Avalon can be (easily) traced back to a single motion picture… 1987’s Back to the Beach. I know, I know… what a disgrace I must be to my early-60s brethren, and this comes with absolutely zero hint of disrespect, but my 8-year-old-self had all but forgotten about this teen idol of yesteryear. A recent holiday haul has rectified that situation (thanks, folks!), so now we spin, and relearn from this classic tiger beat.

The King

Preceding 1986’s Blood & Chocolate by only seven months is this T-Bone Burnett-produced icon, King of America. Billed as The Costello Show featuring the Attractions and Confederates in the UK and simply The Costello Show featuring Elvis Costello in the US, this 15-tracker clocks in at just under an hour (57:36) and features Costello’s fixation with Americana (at some points sounding almost completely country… but in a good way). The cover photo is emblematic and was my only visual recollection of Mr. Costello for much of my budding years… so much so that I thought it was a cover to a Greatest Hits or catch-all double or triple CD box, but alas, just a groovy cover to a groovy album, his 10th studio effort.

Mondo vs. Mondon’t

Let me just simply say this… I love Mondo. Their hassle-free, quick shipping and superb packing make for worry-free ordering. This, coupled with their almost frequent limited pressings makes any release a complete no-brainer. Case in point, this White Russian vinyl colored 20th anniversary release of The Big Lebowski (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack). A pro tip for those not already doing this: get on their mailing list, and set calendar reminders for online sale times, because when they’re gone, they’re gone, and third party sales over at Discogs will make you wish you did.