Punk Rock BBQ, August 2018 Edition

Another Sunday, another successful Punk Rock BBQ. Starting off the day’s festivities was Herbert., a whimsical, one-man-dixieland-show, complete with prosthetic mask and demonic-like vocals. I can honestly say, I’ve never experienced anything like Herbert. before in my life, and I want to experience much, much more! Photo provided of mike watt + the secondmen, which was, like always, an amazingly good time. Lawndale and The Last rounded out the set (not in that order), and cheap drinks and free dogs were enjoyed by all. I can’t wait for the next iteration!

BBHC

Saturday’s Venice Music Festival showcased the mind-bending blues rockers, Big Brother and the Holding Company. Free shows are all the rage this weekend, and not one performer left us wanting more. There are tons of free shows in-and-around the Los Angeles area on any given weekend, and the Venice Music Festival is certainly one we’ll be sure to return to. Also, BBHC KILLED it!

Order Steve Miller Schwag

Oh, Steve Miller. Tucked inside my 1977 copy of Book of Dreams was this pristine insert order form. From posters, to a concert / tour book, to a variety of shirts, and finally to a grab-bag fan club kit, Jokers and Jet Airliners alike could spend their hard-earned, late 70s cash on solid Steve Miller schwag, and for seemingly modest prices. One can never have too much Steve Miller schwag as far as I’m concerned, and the fine people at Capitol Records felt the same way.

“Unusual”

Is something unusual just because you declare it to be unusual? Well, since truth isn’t truth, I suppose so? Presented here is the smash debut by Cynthia Ann Stephanie Lauper, 1983’s She’s So Unusual. My love for Cyndi Lauper stems from The Goonies, mainly, but this album is kind of essential for your 80s vinyl collection… that and Animotion’s Animotion.

Souls

I remember visiting California in late 1999 from Wisconsin, and heading down to Huntington Beach for seafood and discovering a little hole-in-the-wall record shop adjacent to the staple restaurant. Ducking in while we waited for a table, I was floored to discover the rainbow of plush, punk records, cheap, and ripe for the picking. We didn’t have near enough time to dig through everything, but I was able to procure the first album by The Bouncing Souls, The Good, The Bad, and The Argyle. The picture presented here is the non-lyric side of that 1994 album’s insert.

1st

The Bee Gees, like you (may have) never heard them before! Almost a decade before their award-winning work on the grimy, mirror-ball-spinning Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, the Bee Gees, then a five-piece, dug their feet firmly into the mushroom-laden ground of late 60s pop psychedelia. Case-in-point, their debut album, Bee Gees’ 1st. Though the three singles are New York Mining Disaster 1941, To Love Somebody, and Holiday, it’s the opener, Turn of the Century that is an absolute must-hear. Bee Gees’ 1st is a pleasant and blissful listen, and comes, strangely, very highly recommended.

It’s All in the Reflexes

Man, do I love Mondo. Though there is a SDCC (San Diego Comic Con) pressing on clear vinyl with blue splatter (limited to only 500 copies), I’m more than happy to own this retail version on blood red splattered vinyl. This soundtrack to John Carpenter’s unquestionable classic, Big Trouble in Little China, is a remastered, double LP set, and sounds absolutely perfect. If you don’t already own the original 1986 soundtrack, or hell, if you do, treat yourself (right now) to this essential classic, and remember, it’s all in the reflexes.

Off Broadway

Between my fits of laughter over movie quotes pertaining to tomorrow’s post, I remember an old, short-lived Chicago punk band from the Asian Man Records label. The Broadways released one studio album in 1997’s Broken Star. Presented here is a reissue from a questionable, yet recent year on gray marble vinyl. It’s either from 2008, 2014, or 2016. My memory tends to lag these days. Anyway, check out 15 Minutes for a good idea of this seminal band. You’re welcome.

Mr. Bruce

To be completely honest, I’m not exactly sure where, or by what means I acquired Lenny Bruce’s first two records. Ebay maybe? This would have been quite some time ago, but it’s been a while since I spun either of them. Relatively tame, all Lenny Bruce-things considered, I’d still suggest both of these Fantasy Records releases to those of you into history and comedy, and generally anything good. To my knowledge, there are both red and black vinyl versions of both, so, you know, pick your poison.

I Happen to Have the Lyric Sheet at Home

Have you ever wanted to know the lyrics to Minor Threat’s 1984 compilation, Minor Threat? I mean, let’s be honest here. Of course you have. So, allow me to present this 2008 reissue of the original lyric sheet-insert-type-deal. In the bit of research I’ve done on this release, there appears to be several different versions of the cover, some of the early versions fetching a hefty sum. This version was purchased used up in Ventura some 8-or-so years back, not that that matters, but the point is, really, that Minor Threat’s compilation, Minor Threat, is an absolute must-own. Carry on.

De-De-De-Decca!

Man, gone are the days when “Organ” is a marketable category. Circa: 196x?, this “new world of sound” insert shines a stark spotlight into a bit more of the inconspicuous corners of the Decca Records catalog. With bold sections like “Piano” and “Instrumentalists,” it’s fairly evident that Decca wanted to showcase their vast and eclectic tastes, while still adhering to some of their main staples like “Country and Western” and “Folk.” Another day, another insert. Sadly, we’re beginning to run out…

The Beatles’ 20

Not that anyone every would, but someone could potentially only need to acquire this 20-track compilation record to get a very good representation of the luxurious Beatles catalogue. Titled 20 Greatest Hits, this 1982 Capitol Records comp covers (just about) all of the essentials in one, compact record. Like I said, every proper studio release by these clowns is essential for even the modest collector, but in a pinch, 20 Greatest Hits does just fine.

Crass-tastic

Though I haven’t spun Crass, of any sort, in quite some time, I’ll never stop fawning over their politically-charged, yet minimalist cover and label art. Crass was, as you well know, an art collective where their brash-brand of music played only a small roll in their onslaught of knock-you-over-the-head opinions. Today is a good day for Crass, but then again, so is tomorrow.

Golden Planet

I’d been holding out for an original pressing of Digable Planet’s debut, 1993’s Reachin’ (A New Refutation of Time and Space), that was, until I discovered this limited gold vinyl 25th anniversary reissue from February of this year. As the first official vinyl reissue, this double LP is limited to 1000 copies worldwide, and doubles as an “Indie Record Store Exclusive” which is exactly where I found it. The Planets released a total of two studio albums (spanning 1993 – 1994), both of which are essential owns. Next up is 1994’s Blowout Comb, which I’m hoping will get the same 25th anniversary treatment next year.

MDC w/ Pig Champion

I’ll be honest, I’m not exactly sure why I put this Millions of Dead Cops featuring Pig Champion 7″ onto my Discogs wantlist, but for a cool $3.00, I made it mine. This two track quickie features a b-side with Dark Clouds, and a wonderful a-side with I Don’t Want to Hurt You Dude, I Just Want My Shit Back. Released on Honest Don’s Records, a short-lived subsidiary of Fat Wreck Chords, this is a take-it-or-leave it mini party, but all things considered, I’m happy it lives in our collection.

Plastic World

I’m finally starting to round out my Naked Aggression collection, thanks in large part to whiskey and Discogs. Recorded in Cottage Grove, WI, Plastic World is a walloping attack in five bursts from way back in 1994. Every single track is simple, yet blinding punk which is just as fitting now as it was the time in which it was released. For $6, not including shipping, you could add this to your collecting, and let me tell you, you absolutely should.