Order Steve Miller Schwag

Oh, Steve Miller. Tucked inside my 1977 copy of Book of Dreams was this pristine insert order form. From posters, to a concert / tour book, to a variety of shirts, and finally to a grab-bag fan club kit, Jokers and Jet Airliners alike could spend their hard-earned, late 70s cash on solid Steve Miller schwag, and for seemingly modest prices. One can never have too much Steve Miller schwag as far as I’m concerned, and the fine people at Capitol Records felt the same way.

Souls

I remember visiting California in late 1999 from Wisconsin, and heading down to Huntington Beach for seafood and discovering a little hole-in-the-wall record shop adjacent to the staple restaurant. Ducking in while we waited for a table, I was floored to discover the rainbow of plush, punk records, cheap, and ripe for the picking. We didn’t have near enough time to dig through everything, but I was able to procure the first album by The Bouncing Souls, The Good, The Bad, and The Argyle. The picture presented here is the non-lyric side of that 1994 album’s insert.

I Happen to Have the Lyric Sheet at Home

Have you ever wanted to know the lyrics to Minor Threat’s 1984 compilation, Minor Threat? I mean, let’s be honest here. Of course you have. So, allow me to present this 2008 reissue of the original lyric sheet-insert-type-deal. In the bit of research I’ve done on this release, there appears to be several different versions of the cover, some of the early versions fetching a hefty sum. This version was purchased used up in Ventura some 8-or-so years back, not that that matters, but the point is, really, that Minor Threat’s compilation, Minor Threat, is an absolute must-own. Carry on.

De-De-De-Decca!

Man, gone are the days when “Organ” is a marketable category. Circa: 196x?, this “new world of sound” insert shines a stark spotlight into a bit more of the inconspicuous corners of the Decca Records catalog. With bold sections like “Piano” and “Instrumentalists,” it’s fairly evident that Decca wanted to showcase their vast and eclectic tastes, while still adhering to some of their main staples like “Country and Western” and “Folk.” Another day, another insert. Sadly, we’re beginning to run out…

World

Hats off to Tomato, the London-based art collective, for not only the otherworldly cover design to Underworld’s dubnobasswithmyheadman, but also the four-sided insert sleeves. dubnobasswithmyheadman is certainly a work of art, judging by the progressive house music alone, but the overall experience is exemplified by this gorgeous artwork. dubnobasswithmyheadman is, without question, an absolute must-have.

Midnight in 1962

This beautifully designed, mid-century insert (from 1962) accompanied Harry Belafonte’s The Midnight Special album, and could be used (with $2) to redeem The Midnight Special Songbook. This special offer provided fans and purchasers of this album with information on where to send their $2 (Belafonte Enterprises, Inc.), and boasts about the amazing advantages of owning this great songbook: “Now you can sing… play… dance to these songs at parties, at informal gatherings, in the privacy of your own home.” So what’s stopping you? Put down that Two Buck Chuck (which is now no longer two bucks) and take advantage of this exclusive offer!

No One Lives Exception to This Passing Grief

Though I’ve been in (clenched) possession of this amazing Lagwagon box set for 6 years (Putting Music in its Place… the 10 LP box set… you remember…), I hadn’t, until today, noticed this stellar insert for the double Hoss LP. The photo is of high enough quality for you to zoom in and have a laugh to the bottom left corner’s brief history of the album. The center band photo was used in 1994’s Fat Wreck Chords comp, Survival of the Fattest (I remember it from my high school days), but to my knowledge, the photos on either side are exclusive to this release. Anyway, I found this particular story to be quite humorous.

Stop / Yield

Lots to, let’s say, digest in this collage insert from Lard’s 1997 masterwork, Pure Chewing Satisfaction. Keep in mind, this is just one page (out of 30) that accompanied this album. It would take someone close to a year to read the entire booklet (purely estimating here), which is about par for Jello Biafra-related releases (Plastic Surgery Disasters, and I Blow Minds for A Living come to mind).

Roulé

Finally scored Thomas Bangalter’s Trax On Da Rocks Vol. 2 for a sweet, low price, and inside was this flyer for Roulé Records. I’m missing the Roy Davis Jr. record, and not included on this essential checklist is Together, a collaboration between Bangalter and Davis Jr., and Outrage, an three track 12″, and the last from Bangalter on his French label. If you can find them in the states, pick up every single one of these righteous house records. You won’t be sorry.

Protector for Life

Good records (and to a certain extent, the bad ones too) need comfortable, protective, and in this case, relatively dapper sleeves. Pfantone, it appears, deals more in the preamp world these days, but back in the day, they were successful manufacturers of long wear, no tear, poly record sleeves. Pimping a lifetime product is always a ballsy move, but Pfantone has certainly, and without question, pulled off this ambitious claim. For quality, and yes, stylish record care, keep Pfantone in mind.

Brilliant Stereophonic Sound

HiFi Records was very proud to display and present their new, stereophonic albums with this vintage, foldout pamphlet. I’ll be honest. I had this whole post written up and (nearly) ready to publish when I received an error message (thanks, WordPress…) going into intricate detail (not really) about The Beatles and what $5.98 in 1960 was worth today, based, you know, on inflation. And now… I’m just going to be sick… and phone in this great opportunity for a classic post. SAVE YOUR SHIT, KIDS! Oh, and for those few wondering, a stereophonic record from HiFi Records in 1960 went for $5.98. That’s $50.59 today… Let that one sink in.

Offer Expires Dec. 31, 1970

Five great songbooks from the poster boys of pop-folk-rock, Simon & Garfunkel. Complete parts for lead and rhythm guitar and bass for 11 of Simon & Garfunkel’s hits in Songs by Paul Simon – For Guitar, “easy-to-play” arrangements for piano for the entire Bookends album, and Music for Groups, containing lead & rhythm guitar, combo organ, piano, bass and voice! At only $2 a pop, it stands to reason one would logically acquire all five books. Offer expires Dec. 31, 1970, so don’t delay! Bring the joy and pain of Simon & Garfunkel to a casual dinner party near you. Order your copies now!

60-Year-Old Slogan

If your standard, run-of-the-mill record sleeve is referred to as a jacket, think of this simply designed, 60-year-old, thin sheath as an undershirt for your coveted records. RCA Victor Records manufactured this elegant slogan in the late 1950’s (this one found inside Perry Como’s When You Come to the End of Your Day, LSP-1885 from 1958), and although I wasn’t around then to verify the legitimacy of its claim, I dig the somewhat modest approach at presenting this familiar phrase. I tend to side with a company that developed and released the first 33 1/3 record and the first 45 rpm record, so it’s legit in my book.

Ivy

Remaining consistent with the recent Operation Ivy / Lookout! Records trend, presented here is the first side insert to Op Ivy’s Energy. I could be wrong, but I believe all Op Ivy covers and inserts were done by Jesse Michaels, the band’s vocalist, but that could be something I made up as a teenager. Anyway, lots of noteworthy lyrics here, so mix yourself a cocktail, and enjoy some urban poetry.