“I Like Jazz!”

(Reads title.) You do? Good for you, but don’t you think you could have come up with something more, I don’t know, jazzy for the title of this 1955 comp? Titles rarely deter from the music within, and this is no exception. I just had to chuckle at how on-the-nose and unorthodox this title was, while at the same time, and rather quickly, adding it to my hefty pile of dollar bin treasures. One doesn’t go wrong with mid-century Columbia Records jazz artists.

The Beatles’ 20

Not that anyone every would, but someone could potentially only need to acquire this 20-track compilation record to get a very good representation of the luxurious Beatles catalogue. Titled 20 Greatest Hits, this 1982 Capitol Records comp covers (just about) all of the essentials in one, compact record. Like I said, every proper studio release by these clowns is essential for even the modest collector, but in a pinch, 20 Greatest Hits does just fine.

Life in the Fat Lane

FatLaneLife in the Fat Lane, Fat Music Vol. 4 was my first introduction to The Ataris, and their late 90s summer classic, San Dimas High School Football Rules. They must have fallen into obscurity after that, as that was my only exposure to this crazy pop punk band. A quick Discogs check indicates that The Ataris, in fact, did NOT fall into obscurity as they put out a new, self-released album just last year. LitFL also houses Lagwagon’s May 16, Me First & the Gimme Gimmes’ My Favorite Things, and Tilt’s Old School Pig, all of which were late 90s personal classics. Anyway, enjoy your hump day, kids!

Greatest!

Greatest!The first compilation / greatest hits album Johnny Cash released (or rather, the label released for him) was 1959’s appropriately titled, Greatest! 12 cuts, all from the Sun Records library, Greatest! is a breath of fresh, country air even 56 years after its initial release. I have no idea what LPs sold for back in 1959, but this one set me back only $3 just last weekend. Inflation be damned, am I right? Anyway, Greatest! contains some classic, early Cash greats such as Get Rhythm, Luther’s Boogie, a few Hank Williams numbers (Hey, Good Lookin’, You Win Again), and some lesser known classics to round out a full, pertinent collection of tragic songs. Greatest! may not be Cash’s greatest, but it’s worth seeking out.

Swami Sound System

SSSWith shame and guilt do I type these pathetic and shadowed words… I have no idea what this comp sounds like. I don’t remember ordering it, spinning it, nor can I, for the life of me, recall even a fraction of any of these unreleased tracks. The Sultans, Sonny Vincent, Beehive and The Barracudas, Hot Snakes, and Rocket from the Crypt! Please excuse my momentary lapse of all controllable comprehension. This evening’s goal… digitize this album! Thank you for allowing me to share my scandalous humiliation… carry on.

iFloyd

iFloydThe SO is out of town, which means bachelor weekend for this here guy! So the first thing I do… start organizing my 45s… Apart from deciding to start a new RFTC 7” collection, I discovered this outdated sticker / sampler album insert. Titled iFloyd, the now defunct 14-track sampler featured a few previously unreleased tracks (from Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, Against Me!, and Dead to Me), and a slew of classic Fat Wreck Chords mainstays, reminiscent of the old Fat Music comps. Unsure of what to do with this dinosaur, I decide to leave ‘em shoved inside one of the 45 boxes, to be discovered again at a later date. Happy Friday, kids!iFloyd_back