Eye of the Beholder

BeholderNo, not the Rod Serling written, 1960 Twilight Zone classic, but instead the 2nd single from LA-based thrashers, Metallica, off their 1988 effort, …And Justice for All.

This slow-building, structure-oscillating, melodically obtrusive Metallica classic features, for the first time on a full-length release, Jason Newsted on bass. Mr. Newsted would record four studio albums before leaving in 2001. He was the 2nd of three bassists for the band, winning the auditioned spot after the untimely death of original Metallica bassist, Cliff Burton. Current bassist, Robert Trujillo’s audition and ultimate acceptance into the band is featured in the (surprisingly good) documentary, Some Kind of Monster. Even for non-Metallica fans, this doc is a worthy watch.

Eye

Worth noting, the back sleeve lists the trt at 6:25, while the label lists it at 5:89. (89 seconds over 5 minutes yields 6:29, so I’m stumped on this one.)

Death by Trolley

PJ'sBand name: Death by Trolley aka DBT. Does it exist? No, but it should. Do any of you remember the Twilight Zone episode, Judgment Night? For those that don’t, it’s a microscope peak into the looping, déjà vu hell of a German U-boat captain forever reliving the victim’s side of his own, malicious, and blood spilling attacks. For me, a death by trolley, accompanied by Eddie Cano’s version of The Trolley Song, is my own personal night of judgment.

The hit and run victim to this proposed, personal death loop, I picture myself merrily strolling along with a carefree heart, and a suspicious smile. All this is abruptly interrupted at around the 30 second mark when, WHAM! out of nowhere I’m violently struck by the Death Trolley. Able to force out a few, labored breaths, I accept my fate, and proceed to give in to the sweet, calming void of death… only for the entire trip to loop and begin its eternal cycle, that which has no end.

Eddie Cano plays my end song, a duet with the booming, forceful abruptness of the Death Trolley.

The Trolley Song

 

… And Now, Mr. Serling

TZoneIn honor of the Twilight Zone marathon my SO and I are currently feeding to our 2014 heads (along with sushi grade salmon and tuna), I offer an instrumental suggestion that lies between the pit of man’s fears, and the summit of his knowledge… but you know, conducted by Jerry Goldsmith for the 1983 classic, Twilight Zone The Movie.

Its unfortunate Mr. Serling, one of my all-time favorite writers, wasn’t alive for the making of this film. I can’t help but feel his involvement would have helped yield a much more substantial big screen result, mirroring that of the stunning television series. Rest in piece, Mr. Serling, and thank you for creating one of the more creative and thought provoking shows ever produced

You Can’t Have Your Cake and Spin it Too AKA KPOL Radio (1952-1981)

RIP KPOLBroadcasting self proclaimed, “Beautiful Music,” KPOL, “Los Angeles’ first easy-listening music station,” unleashed 21 alluring tracks, which were all “superbly performed by 101 Strings” in celebration for their 20th anniversary-birthday-ceremony-festival-type thing.

I don’t know what’s worse, that this is considered “Beautiful Music,” or that someone actually bought this deluxe 2 record set. (Looks into mirror and notices his unabated shame.) It certainly isn’t “Grotesque Music,” or even “Homely Music” for that matter, it’s just that when I think of the word “beautiful,” 101 strings does not come to mind. (I’m instantly reminded of a certain Twilight Zone episode with the applicable title, The Eye of the Beholder.)

CakeOn a serious note, it’s a bit sad to see the excitement and enthusiasm displayed by this proud and noble radio station, given the chilling fact that they would forever close their doors just nine short years after this celebratory album was released.

“Have a helping of memories,” kids, because our days are numbered…