Guitar Boogie

GuitarBoogieBend your mind one side at a time with 1977’s Guitar Boogie. Fix yourself a heaping plate of last night’s grub, pour out a pint of your favorite brew, dim the lights and drop the needle, because it’s damn near boogie time. Have you heard of these young, up-and-comers? Eric Clapton? Jeff Beck? Jimmy Page? Nah, me neither, but this comp of classic blues-infused slut-rock is essential Monday night listening material, or, at least it is around our household. Sometimes, Mondays need that extra boogie…

DON’T BLAME ME

FPSo reads the warrior of accountabilities pin on the lapel of the heavily saturated, liver-wigged, bloodstained, and anti-patriot of yesterday’s future on the cover of Ministry’s 1996 album, Filth Pig. Scumbags reunite and cast your hollow vote for this season’s cosmetic romance, and paint those faces of joyful optimism and mirroring nationalism with the juice stains of filtered truth and industrial bruising.

No More Faith in Amazon

FNMBeware when purchasing records off Amazon, kids. There may well be a time when you read the description for a 2013 marble red vinyl reissue of Faith No More’s 1994 masterpiece, King for a Day Fool for a Lifetime, and you order and receive its black vinyl brother instead… then again, upon contacting Amazon describing the issue, they send out a replacement that’s… identical. Needless to say, they’re both going back. Buyer beware, kids

Eponymous to Anonymous

E to ALooking for some grade A (+) Mike Patton on a budget? Why not spring for the 2012 Ipecac Recordings box set (also a Record Store Day release, so, that gets a tag), Eponymous to Anonymous. Spanning Tomahawk’s first three albums, this forward-thinking box comes, complete, with room for their 4th release (and future release as of the time of this set’s release), 2013’s Oddfellows. As a “comp” this release sees the first vinyl pressing of both Tomahawk’s first (and best) album, Tomahawk, 2007’s Anonymous, as well as a reissue of 2003’s Mit Gas. Seriously (I really wish I didn’t need the seriously), for those of you into quality vibes without all the schticky bullshit, get this box set. Happy Friday and drive safely tonight, kids!

Comp Time

54Comps! Comps! Get ‘yer Comps! I grew up on comps, and found them to be a lucrative open door into an unknown, and possibly euphoric new world. Sometimes this world is filled with lavish new shapes and colors presented by then unknown artists with which to analyze and follow, and other times the world is a stale, duct-taped collage of one-note forgettables.

Released in 1979, this Casablanca Records 2 LP comp was my “go-to” disco album (as much as a 17-year-old “goes-to” disco in rural Wisconsin) back in 1997, and is a golden what’s-what of radio-raging jams. Shake Your Groove Thing, Y.M.C.A., Last Dance, Hot Jungle Drums and Voo Doo Rhythm, and Le Freak unveil the shawl to many more sweaty, overheated body-gyrating grooves. If you can stomach disco, A Night at Studio 54 is a great beginner’s guide to the ruckus genre, and comes “high”-ly recommended.

Prime Cuts

PrimeCutsPrime Cuts Vol. 1, the 2000 Delicious Vinyl comp features 2 LPs worth of electro and hip-hop gems from LA’s finest, Delicious Vinyl Records. Label mainstays like The Brand New Heavies, The Pharcyde, Buckwhead, and Fat Lip are all presented, as is the on-again, off-again actress on the cover, Shannyn Sossamon, pre-A Knight’s Tale (remember A Knight’s Tale… remember Shannyn Sossamon?!). Anyway, this comp can be nabbed off Discogs.com for damn cheap ($2 bucks!), and is a great addition to any dub, downtempo fan who likes their beats PG-13, and their lyrics NC-17.

Buy the Ticket, Ride the Lightning

LightningIt’s difficult to comprehend that Ride the Lighting was released in 1984, or at least it’s a bit of a challenge for me to wrap my head around since I was only five at the time. When you consider the big, radio-friendly tracks de jour were Karma Chameleon, Girls Just Want to Have Fun, Footloose, What’s Love Got to Do with It, and When Doves Cry, tracks like Trapped Under Ice, Creeping Death, and Fight Fire with Fire seem to resemble a refreshing iceberg floating amongst a sea of raging-radio hell. I didn’t go to the local shop expecting to Ride the Lighting, but for a cool $12, this guy here has his ticket in hand.

Sincerely, Herb Alpert

SergioSergio Mendes and his Brasil ’66 were given glowing praise by none other than Herb Alpert on the band’s debut album, Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66. In addition to being the producer of the album, presenter, and co-owner of the label, Mr. Alpert offered his pen, and his signature to a praising write-up on the album’s back cover. If you’re not familiar with the vivacious Latin Jazz ensemble, consider Mr. Alpert’s expert opinion on the matter. You certainly will not regret it.

504

hoodSo, for this coffin I’m about to open, this is where I stand… the Ramones are NOT, in my humble opinion, punk. Were they influential monarchs of the mid-70’s rock-crowd-extravaganza? Yes. Grandfathers of punk? (Fuck) no. Proto-punk? YeAH! Where does Death factor into this equation? If the Ramones are, globally considered punk, than Death, without a doubt should also be included into the fold. Disagree? That’s your right, but you’re wrong. 🙂

5” of Freedom

33Introducing, into the fold, the format family of hi-fidelity folly, Rocket from the Crypt’s 1995 release, a covers release if you will, and, for now, you will, Plays the Music Machine. Music-wise, these are covers by the world’s most prolific rock’n’roll band (RFTC) paying homage to the 1966 release by The Music Machine, (Turn on) The Music Machine. So (Monty Python’s “get ON with it” rings fairly true, here), RFTC’s 2-track offering is, in fact, because I now own it, pressed on 5” vinyl. So, depending on which photo your eyes navigate towards, here is the spectrum of sizes this, to my knowledge, format covers. 5” – 7” – 10” – 12”. Enjoy your weekend, you savage bastards (he said lovingly)!

(Clean your keyboard, fool!)

Spectrum